Home cook here, looking for advice on the Hiromoto Gyuto 240mm

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by joedaddio, Jun 27, 2013.

  1. joedaddio

    joedaddio

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    So I've done a bit of research and the Hiromoto Gyuto 240mm seems to be the knife I am leaning towards. I have searched this forum for more info on this knife, however, and I don't seem to find much posted about it, so I have a couple noobish questions.

    But first, about me: I'm a home cook. I cook dinner most nights because, while my wife is a good cook, she hates cooking. I'm a crummy cook (I like to call myself a "learning" cook) but I love cooking. I've found that loving cooking is usually enough to make something delicious at home with a little planning and preparation. I currently use a no-name chef's knife at home and I'm looking to upgrade to a decent Japanese style blade. I really hate how fat and unruly my knife is. A lot of it is skill, I'm sure, but I'm looking for something more thin and nimble.

    I am halfway decent at sharpening. I've been doing it since I was a kid. I'm nothing special but I can get the blade of my crummy no-name knives at home decently sharp on my crummy hand held diamond kit my dad gave to me years ago (I will also be buying a new sharpening kit, most likely the one I see recommended here all the time from CNTG).

    I cut what most home cooks at home cut: moderate amounts of veggies, fruits, and meats. Sometimes nuts and seeds.

    My first question is: I have never owned a clad knife. Does a clad blade require any specialized knowledge to sharpen? What happens when you eventually get to the clad part after years of sharpening?

    Second: Are there any knives in this price range that are going to blow the socks off the Hiromoto? I was originally looking at the Fujiwara FKM and Tojiro DP knives, but they seemed kind of hit or miss on F&F and QC. I figured I'd be okay spending a bit extra to get something I can be confident will last me quite a long while.

    Thank you guys for your info. As a total noob I'm sure there's some things that I am overlooking, so please feel free to ask me anything else or educate me on anything. Thank you in advance for your help.

    joe
     
  2. joedaddio

    joedaddio

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    Thank you for your reply. I was a bit worried about thinning the blade as I sharpened (if it may be a different process with a clad blade), it's good to know it's just going to take me an extra couple minutes whenever I need to sit down and sharpen it to keep it up. I tend to only do it once every couple of sharpenings for my other knives.

    Edit to add: I was in your neck of the woods a couple of weeks ago for my honeymoon. You've got a beautiful place to call home, and everyone I met there was wonderful. I hope to return someday!

    joe
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2013
  3. joedaddio

    joedaddio

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    Thanks for your advice. The idea of bringing the angle to the edge helped sum it up nicely for me. The Chef Knives to Go site sells a set with a 500, 1200 and 5k stone, so i think I'll be pretty well taken care of. I'm thinking of adding a strop set as well, but that probably won't be for a while. I'm sure the 1200 will get me plenty far for my current needs. Thank you!

    joe
     
  4. mostadonte2

    mostadonte2

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    Is there a visible difference between the clad and the AS steel itself, or it more of a guessing/feeling game when you thinning the knife?
     
  5. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Yes there is a visible difference.  However, thinning a clad knife is not really much different than thinning a single steel knife.  What issues are you expecting?

    BDL
     
  6. mostadonte2

    mostadonte2

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    I guess exposing more of the inner layer (core alloy) then necessary/designed is my concern.
     
  7. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Rest easy.  Not a problem unless you're "thinning" at an impossibly acute angle. 

    BDL
     
  8. joedaddio

    joedaddio

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    That's good to know. I makes me feel like I don't need to be in a hurry to get a strop.

    joe
     
  9. mike9

    mike9

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    There are plenty of video lessons on line (youtube) that can help you with the process.  Don't go for the whole enchilada first time out - I'm thinning some of my blades every time I take them to the stones.  It's fun once you get the hang of it - make it a zen thing instead of tedious one.  I like how the AS blues on my Hiro and Carter High Grade Gyutos.  It's a great contrast to the stainless cladding.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2013