Hollandaise sauce

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by chrisbristol, Jul 17, 2014.

  1. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    Hello I just made a hollandaise sauce. The recipe I used is below. I made it twice because it split the first time because the eggs scrambled lightly.  Anyway It was really nice.  I didn't have tarragon vinegar so I added clear vinegar to it and then added some dried tarragon to it.  The only problem was it was a bit to thin.  Not to much but slightly.  It was possibly because the eggs hadn't been whisked on the heat for long enough but I was worried  about them scrambling.  Also I added to butter of the heat like the recipe said but I watched  a Gordon Ramsay video and he said to add it on the heat. I let the butter call slightly again to stop the eggs form scrambling so it was a little bit colder than I would have liked.  Would it be better to add the butter on the heat?

    http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/3921/dead-good-hollandaise-
     
  2. alaminute

    alaminute

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    Yes, over a low flame, the longer you whisk the thicker it gets. You can always whisk your eggs and acid together before putting it on a flame and slightly warming while emulsifying. A lot of people prefer to do it in a metal bowl over a simmering pot of water. I like to use whole butter instead of clarified and just work it in like I was making beurre monte. It's easier and tastes virtually the same but this is classified as a bearnaise without terragon.
     
  3. kingfarvito

    kingfarvito

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    I personally add my butter off the heat. Reduction and egg yolk with a splash of water get whisked over the grill (boiling water would be better for a beginner) until the bottom of the bowl starts to streak. Then I add 6-8 oz of clarified butter per egg yolk.
     
  4. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    Use a water bath until you have mastered that, then you can go to an open flame.
    I made gallons of hollandaise, bearnaise, choron, daily for years.

    Make your yolks the thickness that you want the sauce to be.
     
  5. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    So as long as I'm very careful that the eggs are on a low heat and constantly whisked they won't scramble and split the sauce?
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I agree with Chef Bubba use a water bath until you make it a few times. Then you can use a blender and hot butter if you lioke
     
  7. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    See mine.  There is only a splash of water in the pan, no vinegar.  When the steam comes out is when the yolks are cooked.  At this point you can decide if you want to cook the yolks more, if so, add a splash more water.

    Add salt and pepper, lemon juice at the end.  This is your basic Hollandaise.

    If you need to you can loosen it up afterward with a drop of warm water, tighten with cold.  This is good to know if you want to hold it for anything past a couple minutes. 

    Also note, whisk in a figure 8 pattern.

     
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2014
    oldschool1982 likes this.
  8. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    A good tip on keeping your bowl steady when adding the butter is to roll up a couple of towels into a circle and set your bowl on that.
     
  9. kingfarvito

    kingfarvito

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    The towel trick works pretty well, I prefer a towel laid into a sautee pan, same idea, quicker to set up. Also if you add your acid first it brings up the coagulation temp of the protein in the eggs. This will make it harder to scramble the eggs. A note on not scrambling eggs, keep your water just below a summer and don't stop whisking.
     
  10. alexalexnyc

    alexalexnyc

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    A chef in Brooklyn taught me to add a light coating of vinegar on the yolks while it is in the mixing bowl and set it aside until it warms up a bit. When I'm done setting up the line for brunch (about 35-45 minutes) the yolks are ready for the Hollandaise process. I always use this method now and with great success. Sometimes it becomes too tight and I have to thin it out with some water at the end. It holds well throughout the brunch shift.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2014
  11. fredrikh

    fredrikh

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    Reduce double cream until its really thick, add that to your sauce. You can put it in with your eggs in the beginning or add the finished sauce to the cream in the end (last way is the best way, and add the sauce to the cream, not the other way around). Makes it hold for ages. Also fixes it if it splits from standing to long/cold/hot.. 

    I usually just whisk eggs yokes with some vinegar or and lemon until frothy and then add the hot melted butter, clarified first, if it gets to thick, add the white.

    Hope it helps
     
  12. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    I've posted 3 recipes for the following sauces directly from my computer files so please excuse any layout issues.

    They are for a bulk prep and have been modified from the traditional recipe in regards to proportions. It is possible to scale things down for home use but add the season and flavor ingredients at the end to taste. Use caution since it can change the consistency given that was set in the initial cooking of the egg mixture. I did use the same method to cook the eggs initially, as highlighted by @kuan, and originally changed to this method as a measure to keep the sauce from breaking two hours into service. Seriously, it was a true pain in the ares to try and fix or remake the sauce in the middle of a 800 cover service and the reduction of clarified butter helped, it also lowered the food cost as an unintended side-effect. Everyone was happy with the end product since it remained a very rich and flavorful sauce that didn't break....even under direct exposure with heat lamps.

    RECIPE TITLE:  Sauce Hollandaise                                                               DATE:   04-12-1986

    YIELD:                                                                                                      SHELF LIFE:   4 hours   

    INGREDIENTS                        AMOUNT           PROCEDURES                                                                                                   

    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    egg yolks

    salt

    white pepper

    lemon juice, fresh

    Tabasco sauce

    water

    butter, clarified, max 100 degrees

    32

    2 tsp

    1 tsp

    3 Tbl + 2 tsp

    1 Tbl

    2 Tbl

    2 qts

    Separate eggs and place in large mixing bowl. Combine all ingredients, except butter, and mix thoroughly.  Cook over low-medium flame, constantly whipping to prevent eggs from scrambling.  Cook until thick, smooth and ribbon-like or nappe in consistency.  Remove from heat and let set for 2-3 minutes to stabilize.  Next, very, very slowly add clarified butter, whipping fast constantly.

    S.I.  If you add butter too fast or mixture is too hot, it will cause sauce to break.


    RECIPE TITLE: Sauce Béarnaise                                                                    DATE:   04-12-1986

    YIELD:                                                                                                      SHELF LIFE:   4 hours   

    INGREDIENTS                        AMOUNT               PROCEDURES                                                                                                

    Hollandaise sauce

    red wine vinegar

    tarragon, dried*

    red onion, minced fine

    *Fresh may be substituted at the rate of 1oz. wt but remove all large stems, chop and add at to vinegar reduction at halfway point of reducing.

    1 X batch

    1 cup

    3 Tbl

    1/4 cup

    Place red wine vinegar, red onion and tarragon in small saute’ pan and reduce over medium-high flame until mixture is just moist.  (Caution DO NOT brown mixture!)  Remove mixture from pan and fold into Hollandaise sauce. 

    KEEP AWAY FROM INTENSE HEAT!


    RECIPE TITLE:  Sauce Choron                                                                      DATE:   04-12-1986

    YIELD:                                                                                                      SHELF LIFE:   4 hours   

    INGREDIENTS                        AMOUNT               PROCEDURES                                                                                                   

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Béarnaise sauce

    tomato paste*

    Finely chopped, sundried tomatoes may be substituted at the same rate. Reconstitute the tomatoes by steeping them in boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain well and chop fine in Robot Coupe.

    1 X Batch

    1 cup

    Place Béarnaise sauce in mixing bowl and add tomato paste. Gently fold tomato paste into sauce

    Special instructions:   Fold with plastic spatula.  Start from outside and mix inward with figure 8 motion.  DO NOT OVER MIX OR WHIP!

    KEEP AWAY FROM EXTREME HEAT.

    :edited for spelling
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2014
    meezenplaz likes this.
  13. foodpump

    foodpump

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    As an apprentice, we were never allowed to make Hollandaise until after a good stint in the pastry kitchen.  One of the big sellers for dessert was sabayon...

    A good hollandaise is a sabayon with butter added.  Master the sabayon and you can dump butter in without it ever breaking,  I've done it in 30 qt Hobart bowls and dumped butter in, always holds, never breaks.

    The "method" we were taught to make sabayon was to get a sauce pan full of boiling water.  In a mixing bowl, get the yolks, sugar, and booze combined.  Pull the sauce pan off the heat and make sure the bowl sits above the water, never in it. Whisk, and push the sauce pan over the heat when necessary, but never longer than 30 seconds.

    Master the sabayon and your holly will never break...
     
  14. chefross

    chefross

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    While I admire those places that put Hollandaise on the menu, it is difficult to keep during service so many places make the fake stuff.

    If I am having Eggs Benedict and the price is $9.95 I know the sauce is fake.

    If I ask the server if they make their sauce from scratch and they say yes, then I'll order it....even then it may not be the real thing.

    Why bother to even have it on the menu of it is not the REAL thing. 
     
  15. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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  16. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    @kuan,

    Seriously, 800!

    There was a time in the 80's at this place back in Atlanta where our pace was up around 700-900 every Friday and Saturday night for months. The place had just finished an addition that added over 100 extra seats so before that, we were around 600 rather consistantly.

    Anyhow, we'd knock out 400 on a Tuesday and I swear that was like sitting still. I think we averaged around $125,000 a week in sales (we're talking 1986 dollars) and I was lucky enough to be on Saute most of that time. That was the one position, other than expo, that directly used the sauce....on oysters Rock. Talk about a nightmare! 12 eye's (4 covered with cast iron blackening skillets) 4 ovens and a salamander. All I can say is thank gawd I had a runner for back-ups.

    Hope the recipes made sense. It's been so long since I used them, I can't remember if there was anything I tweeked to make it work best. Something keeps telling me it was the butter so if anyone try's the recipes, please use your best judgment.
     
  17. kingfarvito

    kingfarvito

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    Ross,my phone wont let me quote, the country club I worked for has been running benedict for $10 for years. I was under the impression it was fairly common? Then again I don't go out to breakfast often.
     
  18. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    *coff* Think he's talking real life where people want food cost down below 30 percent and don't pay overtime.  Ever.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2014
  19. kingfarvito

    kingfarvito

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    Alright you got me there, I'm on my way back into real restaurant life I swear!
     
  20. grande

    grande

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    I worked at a place where we did 700 plus fri-sat. Mothers day brunch was over a thousand. Coincidentaly the only place i,'ve worked that didn't have eggs benedict on the brunch menu!