Hindenburg last flight menu

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by marcocom, Nov 18, 2015.

  1. marcocom

    marcocom

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    Hi everyone, I'm trying to recreate the dinner menu of the last flight of the german aiship Hindenburg, anyone has an idea on what the "rhine salmon a la Graf Zeppelin" could be?? Thanks for any help you can give me.

     
  2. grande

    grande

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  3. marcocom

    marcocom

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    Thanks for your attention and help, i'll study the menu you found, however, I'm still so curious about that salmon!!! :)) and the story of Xavier Maier, the Hindenburg Chef!!
     
  4. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I did some research and found 4 totally different last menus. I also found a version of your menu that was in "American menu speak" and it listed the salmon dish as cold salmon with a spice sauce and potato salad.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2015
  5. marcocom

    marcocom

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    Hello Cheflayne,

    Thank you very much for your reply, and very nice to meet you!

    Really interesting, could you tell me where did you find this?

    I'm also trying to find notices about Xavier Meier, the Chef of the Hindenburg, I know that after the disaster of Lakehurst he came back to Germany and worked in some Grand Hotels in Frankfurt, I'm trying to find what hotels and hope to find maybe similar on their menù!

    Any suggestion?
     
  6. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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  7. marcocom

    marcocom

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    Thanks Phatch,

    for the precious link!

    Nice to meet you
     
  8. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    What an interesting topic !

    Is this for a theme dinner?

    mimi
     
  9. marcocom

    marcocom

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    Hi Mimi,

    very nice to meet you!

    Well, this topic puts together two big passion of mine, history and cooking! ;-))

    And yes, is for a theme dinner, my wife work as a marketing manager at a local hotel, and she is going to schedule the special events for the next year.

    I'm trying to help her...
     
  10. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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  11. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    It's also worth considering what spicy means at different times and places. I suspect this would be milder by today's standards. 
     
  12. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    After the Hidenburg, he went on to work at the Parc Hotel in Frankfurt. At the 1980 IKA in Frankfurt, he was the coach of the German National Team that was crowned Olympic Champions.
     
  13. marcocom

    marcocom

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    Hi Cheflayne,

    I allready know he worked at the Park Hotel in Frankfurt, but... beeing the coach of the German National Team at IKA 1980 it's great!

    Even if in those times chefs was not such popular to a large audience like they're today, I think could be possible to find a biography or a cookbook about Xavier Maier.

    Thaanks for the suggestion.

    P.S. today i'm going to make a traditional beans soup, later i'll post something on the soup contest thread...  :)))
     
  14. mikelm

    mikelm

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    Hope you'll post anything you find on Xavier Meier; that's my last name.  It means ""farm manager" in German.  My German ancestors arrived in 1848 and went to be cattle farmers in southeast Missouri for over 100 years.

    Mike
     
  15. patrick russell

    patrick russell

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    Hello all!

    I just found this discussion a little while ago and thought I ought to chime in (assuming any of you are still checking in here, of course.)

    The article about the Hindenburg's last flight menus on the Projekt LZ 129 blog is mine. I've been researching Zeppelin history, including the Hindenburg, for the past few decades, and maintain both Projekt LZ 129 and Faces of the Hindenburg (bio articles on all 97 passengers and crew from the final flight.)

    As far as the last flight menus go, I was given a photocopy of the May 4, 1937 menu a number of years back along with a number of copies other bits and pieces of Hindenburg-related ephemera. Then, in 2011, RTL in Germany ran a documentary on the last Hindenburg flight which included an image of the menu for May 5, 1937. As I'd provided some historical consulting assistance to the producer, he was kind enough to send me a DVD copy, from which I made a screen capture of the menu.

    From the photocopy of the menu from May 4th and the screen capture of the menu from May 5th, I was able to transcribe the menus into the article I was writing for my Projekt LZ 129 blog. As such a high percentage of the Hindenburg's passengers along the North Atlantic route tended to be American, onboard menus were printed in both German and English, which certainly made my job a bit easier.

    So, for what it's worth, those are my sources for the menu information in that blog article. I've also read the History.com "Hungry History" article, and I strongly suspect that the author of that article may have gotten her menu information from my blog, as it's really not readily available elsewhere without a heck of a lot of digging. I'm really flattered, naturally, to have material from my article used elsewhere, and I think the History.com author did a fine job of describing the Hindenburg's onboard kitchen and smoking room, as well as the typical mealtime offerings. My only concern is that she seems to have gotten some of her information switched around in terms of which meals were served on which days of the final flight.

    This is completely understandable, as the "last" available menu for the final flight is actually for May 5th, the day before the disaster. Originally, the Hindenburg was scheduled to land at 6:00 in the morning on May 6th, and so no menus were created ahead of time for that day. Then, the ship was delayed by headwinds over the North Atlantic, which delayed her landing until late afternoon on May 6th. So Chef Maier would have improvised a lunch menu out of whatever they still had in the ship's larders. The Chief Steward probably typed up or wrote out a number of copies of the improvised menu to place on the tables, but of course none of those would have been likely to survive the fire that night.

    But even once he came up with a lunch menu, Maier still didn't plan for dinner, because the airship was to have landed before dinnertime. Then, at the very last minute, thunderstorms delayed the landing even further, and "dinner" for the passengers ended up being a tray of sandwiches that Maier sent up to the passenger lounge while the Hindenburg cruised along the Jersey shore waiting for a break in the weather. 

    The upshot of it all is, we don't know what specifically was served on the last day of the Hindenburg's fateful final voyage. Breakfast was the usual Continental breakfast spread. Lunch... probably something vaguely similar to the lunches the previous two days: a soup to start, some sort of meat entree with veggies/salad, a dessert, and coffee. As for the sandwiches served in place of dinner, one can surmise that they were probably an array of ham/chicken/beef sandwiches - nothing terribly special, just something to keep body and spirit together while the passengers waited to land.

    But we do know what was served on the first two days of the flight, and technically the last dinner ever served aboard the Hindenburg was the one from the evening of May 5th, the night before the disaster.

    I know this rambled on a bit, but I hope it helps to clarify a few things. If there's anything else I can answer, please feel free to ask. I'll try to remember to check back here from time to time. I can also be contacted via email - that info appears on both of my Hindenburg-related blogs.

    Bon appetit!

    Patrick