HIMALAYAN SALT PLATE

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kimmit, Sep 15, 2013.

  1. kimmit

    kimmit

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    We were given a large, thick himalayan salt plate as a gift.  It is fabulous to look at, but my first attempt at cooking with it produced a very salty result.  Does anyone have any tips? What I did was, place it in the oven to get hot. I par boiled some broccoli, slices of squash and some baby potatoes.  I think the salt plate was hot enough, as the food sizzled when placed on top.  I realise that things will be salty, but it was almost inedible. 
     
  2. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Wow what a nice gift?  I've personally never seen one or eaten from one or cooked with one.  I thought they were only used as plates.  I didn't know you could cook with it so I'm interested to learn how to.  
     
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  3. french fries

    french fries

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    I've never heard of those either. But my guess is, anything watery will disolve the salt, which is probably why slices of squash for example may create water and end up making your dish overseasoned?
     

    If I had one and was attempting to cook with it I'd probably start by roasting some meat on it, for example a whole chicken?
     
  4. kimmit

    kimmit

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    French Fries - that is what I have decided...but anything I put on there will be "wet"?  We don't eat meat, but have heard that fish works well.  Lots of experimenting to do! 
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I would think of this more in the style of a dry fondue. Very thinly sliced vegetables and meats. Very hot salt plate/stone at the table. 

    Oil it lightly with an oil and let the diners quickly sear off their selections on the hot stone. Should take  10 seconds on a side or so. 

    Something like this (from Dzur by Stephen Brust):
    Each chapter starts with a course of this particular meal, and it sounds majestic.
     
  6. french fries

    french fries

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    I'm sure fish would work well, especially skin side down, or a whole fish. Chicken skin and fish skin are waterproof no? In any case, I believe you should get a crispy salty skin, but the salt won't penetrate the flesh, so it shouldn't end up overseasoned. I'm thinking of the example of the whole chicken cooked in a salt crust (you can do the same thing with a whole fish):

     
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  7. dcarch

    dcarch

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    Using the salt block to cook food should be done with a lot of try & true thinking in advance.

    Salt block is a poor conductor of heat, and it cannot hold a lot of BTUs. Depending on the recipe, it will make your food too salty to be edible.

    I sometimes do the opposite. I refrigerate the salt block.

    dcarch


     
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  8. kimmit

    kimmit

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    Oh my...that does sound majestic,,,just loved that & am going to have to read more by Mr Brust. Thanks for this!
     
  9. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    You may also want to look at Mark Bitterman's book, 'Salt Block Cooking ' which has alot of techniques in it.
     
  10. kimmit

    kimmit

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    Thanks petalsandcoco, will check it out.