High School Culinary

Discussion in 'General Culinary School Discussions' started by jim berman, Feb 13, 2003.

  1. jim berman

    jim berman

    Messages:
    1,908
    Likes Received:
    273
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I have just taken on the role of a Sophomore/Junior High School Culinary Arts teacher. My question is this... as newer entrants to the culinary arts field, what would you consider to be the best taught items for these budding professionals? What about the push for post-secondary culinary arts schools or straight into the field?
    Thanks for your insight!
     
  2. ironchefatl

    ironchefatl

    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Other
    Easy topics to discuss would be items that we learned early on here (CIA). Culinary Math, Food Safety, Gastronomy (it was a fun class), and Product ID. See what you can do about getting some ServSafe info. Knife skills is improtant also. Let them research famous classic chefs and contemporary ones also. The ones that come to mind are...Careme, Escoffier, Ferdinand Point. Contemorary guys like Thomas Keller, Ferran Adria, Alice Waters, Allain Ducasse, Paul Bocuse. You could discuss seasonality of products. How much of the class is academic and how much is cooking?? Do they expect to have to research and do academics or is it a "fun" elective, like beefed up home ec?

    As for Post-secondary schools you should explain different career paths they can take. Some people choose an associates degree and thats all they want. Some will follow that up by going to a major university for bachelors degree. You can get a Bachelors of Professional Studies here at the CIA now. You can take your education as far as you want, and maintain a culinary/ hospitality path. I would think that for a HS student post-secondary schools is the way to go.
     
  3. jock

    jock

    Messages:
    1,310
    Likes Received:
    15
    Exp:
    At home cook
    I agree with all the IronChef says but I would make sure you include some hands on stuff right from the get go. Most people coming into the culinary classroom for the first time have no idea of the range of knowlege required beyond standing at a stove. I would be concerned about students loosing interest if it is all lecture to begin with.
    Just my 2 cents :)

    Jock
     
  4. jim berman

    jim berman

    Messages:
    1,908
    Likes Received:
    273
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    It is a regular Vo-Tech program for 10th & 11th grade students. My classes focus on fron-of-the house as well as fundamental kitchen principals. Since I am on half way thorug the year, I have enherited an 'in place' curriculum, which works well. There have been reviews of Point, Careme, et al. Also, they have already gone through the equipment ID phase. My focus, now, is to drive them into getting ready for their practical kitchen experience as Seniors. In this arena, they will produce food used for everyday service.
    In general, the class week starts with a brief lecture, some type of development/activity and then assessment. I agree, Jock, that too much lecture is unproductive.
    Thanks for the input.
     
  5. ironchefatl

    ironchefatl

    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Other
    In a hands on class, I think it will be important to show them some classical techniques. Then follow up with what you would be likely to see in the industry today. One thing that is appreciated about instructors here is they change what the presentations of an item if we make it twice. One group of students makes a dish one day, and the next day a different group will make it. The chef will demonstrate different ways to make a sauce (or how to tweak the flavor and make a different sauce), or revamp the whole presentation. Sometimes just throw a different garnish idea at us. Good luck and have fun.