High End Left-Handed Knife Set

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by drpartagas, Nov 12, 2015.

  1. drpartagas

    drpartagas

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    I need to order a  left handed high quality knife set.

    Money is not an issue.

    Aesthetics and top quality are my priority.

    I like and prefer Shun (Kaji and Premier ...)and other Japanese knives but I am open to Western style companies as well. Many are not left-handed friendly. I love the higher end Japanese lines.

    I cook in the home.

    My knife sharpening skills must be learned.

    I desire something that is top quality. 

    I will add additional knives in time.

    Which companies should I consider in my quest.

    Your ideas are appreciated!
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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  3. markrmoore2

    markrmoore2

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    Would you happen to be any good at wood working?
     
  4. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Geshin Ginga are symetrical grind, it might take a few months to acquire the items you want as stocking is a problem.  For about double the price there is the Tanaka ironwood.  I think the Takamura pro line are symetrical.  You really want to spend money there is the Geshin Kagekiyo, not sure the grind though, and again there is a stocking problem.  Miyabi birchwood are nice.

    We are a little confused by the apparently conflicting statements, "Knife Set", and, "I will pick up more knives in time."

    Is there a particular style knife you want to start out with and gradually build a set, of sorts, matching or otherwise?

    You want all stainless?

    Do you mind laser thin or want something more robust?

    The stone set is easy though, Geshin 3 piece all the way.

    Rick
     
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  5. markrmoore2

    markrmoore2

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  6. drpartagas

    drpartagas

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    Sorry, about the confusion.

    I'm basically looking for a collection of individual pieces ( a 5-6 piece kitchen collection) in lefty compatible format that look aesthetically great and also hold an edge longer.

    Not sure which type of steel I should focus on. Advice is appreciated since I am not yet proficient with sharpening skills. I am learning every day.

    I like Gesshin Ginga and Gengetsu and Kagekiyo and Kagero series knives but open to alternate ideas and knife makers.

    My system is to replace my current knives with:

    Wa-Petty        135 or 150mm and a 210 mm

    Wa-Gyuto       240 mm

    Wa-Santoku   180mm  or Kajekiyo

    Sujihiki           ( not sure which length)

    Kiritsuke         ( not sure)

    Which would you choose in a 5 knife system?

    I am flexible.

    Which steel?
     
  7. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    240 gyuto
    150mm petty
    270 or 300 sujihiki

    Forget the others and spend he money on sharpening stones and specialty knives depending on what you cook. E.g. butchery knives, fish knives, chicken knives..
     
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  8. drpartagas

    drpartagas

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    Thanks
     
  9. kitchenheist

    kitchenheist

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    I would say 240mm Gyuto is too big, especially for home cooking. I own a slighlty oversized 21cm knife (Yu Kurosaki Megumi 215mm Gyuto) and would not recommend going any bigger for home use.
     
  10. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Depends what you need to cut.  210 is short for some produce.  Lettuce, cabbage, squash, pumpkin, a watermelon.  Heck even a big onion
     
  11. kitchenheist

    kitchenheist

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    I have sliced plenty of very big onions with that knife. As well as squash, cabbage and other big ingredients with ease. If you are looking for all rounder, 240mm will be too big for a lot of tasks. But I guess it's down to personal preference.
     
  12. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I used to cut everything, including large cabbages, butternut squashes, watermelon, etc, with nothing but a very flexy 8" slicer.  Let me tell you it wasn't fun, in fact for most people it would be a somewhat dangerous thing to do, and very dangerous with the particular kind of knife I was using.  

    Small knife=less leverage=more force required=accident waiting to happen - in many prep situations.  Not to mention the damage that could befall the knife itself.

    I personally have no use for a 210 as a goto knife, though a 210 for someone else's goto could be just fine.  But regardless of your physical stature you would be well served to have a decent 240, better still a 10"+, on hand for the big tasks.  For the latter anything like a Vic Fibrox or Tojiro DP would be just fine, and the investment of around $50 well worth it.

    Rick
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2015
  13. kevpenbanc

    kevpenbanc

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    Takamura Hana R2
    Tanaka Ironwood R2
    Masashi Kobo SLD

    These are all knives I have experience of.
    They are all top notch knives and hit the aesthetic button, at least for me :)
    I'm a righty not a lefty, but am not aware of any lefty issues.

    The R2 knives get stinky sharp and hold an edge for a long time.
    The SLD is impressive too, if not as long lasting as the R2.
     
  14. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Probably the difference is technique.  IMO a knife should be moving both horizontal and vertical when you cut; either a push or pull cut.  210 on a cabbage means you are doing straight up and down chopping and trying to push through the product with some force.  It's how razors work, but not how I would like to use a knife.

    Aside from that, shorter knives will usually have shorter heel height and less knuckle clearance; this is just preference I like tall knives.  They also have worse edge retention because more of it makes board contact on average (especially if you do straight up and down chopping)

    I've heard good things about Yu Kurosaki and I would try one if I was in the market for non cleaver knives
     
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