High Carbon Steel Knife Information?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by masonrk, Feb 8, 2016.

  1. masonrk

    masonrk

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    Hi,

    I am new to the forum. My grandmother has just recently passed, she was an avid cook and her father was a chef at the Waldorf Astoria in NYC. I have just recently acquired a Hoffritz bread knife, and a Veritable Chef Au Ritz knife that I found buried away in her belongings(almost sinful). She taught me everything I know about cooking, so as you may imagine these knifes are very special to me, especially the Chef Au Ritz.

    The reason why this post is so vaugely named is because I have a wide variety of questions that hopefully some of you may be able to answer:

    - Proper maintenance of High Carbon steel blades?

    - Best way of putting on and keeping an edge?

    -I would like to have a collection of blades for when I have my own place(I'm 17 currently), so I wanted you're opinion on good old knife brands?

    - Any other tips, tricks, or information?

    I know it's a lot of questions and I truly thank you all for you're time.

    Warm Regards, Mason
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2016
  2. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Welcome to cheftalk.  Well it was interesting looking up Hoffritz.  Found one of their vintage carbon breads that had a huge radius sinusoidal wave pattern of a cutting edge.

    Show us pictures on the knives.  There is bound to be some restoration needed involving thinning and reprofiling of the Au Ritz blade.  This and sharpening the bread knife may be a bit too much of an undertaking for you at the moment.

    For now just keep your knives dry and in a dry place, don't start using them in the kitchen yet.  If you have problems with humidity then put a light coat of mineral oil on the blades, but don't get oil on the handles for now, except very lightly on any exposed steel.  The handle scales may need some epoxy work.
     
  3. masonrk

    masonrk

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    I already tried to sand the rust off of the blade with 220 grit sand paper and same treatment to the scales. After sanding I lightly coated the scales in linseed oil... Shit. I will post pics soon.
     
  4. masonrk

    masonrk

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    Here is the Au Ritz

    *the deep grinds were not from me. My grandfather tried to sharpen it on the grinder...
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2016
  5. masonrk

    masonrk

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    I also obtained this no name knife, thoughts?
     
  6. masonrk

    masonrk

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    Last the Hoffritz...

    Thank you for the help!
     
  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    The scales look OK.  I'm afraid your GF was a hack though, looks like he even ground the edge, not good but not the end of the world.

    The blade is not in really bad shape, even though you can see the bolster protruding past the edge it looks like the profile in front has been maintaned in great part.

    What if any is your experience/capabilities here?  If you're still in HS the shop teacher might help you.  On your own you will need at least a good course stone, and preferably something powered to grind back and relieve the bolster.

    Rick

    PS  I believe that last one is actually a salmon/ham knife rather than BK
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2016
  8. masonrk

    masonrk

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    I fancy myself as a woodworker but I don't work with too much wood! I can grind back the bolster with my bench grinder and finish the grind with a random orbit sander. I'm still waiting on getting wet stones until the knifes are ready for sharpening.

    There is something I noticed with the Au Ritz, the spine seems to be a bit bent. It's small but I imagine I might have more work ahead of me? And if anyone thinks that I need to just keep it as an heirloom and try and get others just say so. As much as I'd like to fix it up I don't want to ruin it!

    Lastly, does anyone know anything about the second knife that has no name? Quality, use, etc?
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2016
  9. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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  10. masonrk

    masonrk

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    I doing some research into wet stones and I came across these:

    Any thoughts? I was going to go with shapton stones but I can't justify spending that much on a first set of stones...
     
  11. masonrk

    masonrk

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    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2016
  12. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Norton is a huge company and their abrasives are widely used in industry, which makes it funny that I've almost never hear of their products on knife forums.  Google search didn't provide what I would call reliable info, I don't trust the water-stone opinions of someone who says they use sandpaper and/or DMT diamond hones.  Still the price is right, and they are full-sized stones.  A similarly priced set can be had from chefsknivestogo, but no flattening stone.  You can also just get combination King stones on amazon for $25.

    Your no-name knife is most likely generic that was sold to restaurants and to sharpening services that supplied the knives also.  Sometimes the sharpener would etch their company name on them.  By the fifties I think most had gone stainless.

    Rick
     
  13. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Two great sources for oil stones would be:
    1. Halls Pro Edge aka Halls Sharpening Stones but I think that they've gone out of business
    2. Sharpening Supplies dot com.
    Get the NORTON IM313 Tri Hone with 11 inch bench stones at Sharpening Supplies and you won't be disappointed.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2016
  14. masonrk

    masonrk

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    The thing is that I currently don't have enough $$ to spend $170 on stones. I figured that if Wustof had a try stone then it wouldn't be bad until I got proficient and upgraded... I find $50 a lot more appealing then $170 solely because of my current income, and i would think that I would do okay with a reputable company like Wustof, right?
     
  15. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Good Arks are rather expensive, and they cut very slow compared to water stones, though I'll say that a translucent Ark makes a decent fine finisher for knives like the ones here.

    I have to say stick with waterstones here, it's what most everybody uses for kitchen knives.  That and loaded strops.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2016