Hi

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by luko, Jul 24, 2014.

  1. luko

    luko

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    hello, I'm a pizzamaker from Italy and I'm here because I need help with my knifes
     
  2. rwking198

    rwking198

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    What about your knives is it that you need help with?
     
  3. luko

    luko

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    I need help about shar my knifes

    I've got a 10'' F. Dick ProDynamic chef knife and a 7'' zwilling santoku motion (it's not a 4 stars http://database.zwilling.com/artikel...63312/size/600 )

    Now I own just a very cheap stone 300 grit (I paid that some like 3-4$). but I think who it's better if I use that just for train my self with old knifes. am I right? 

    what's the kind of sharpening stone who I need for sharp my two knifes (I can spend less than 55$)?  

    how can I understood if a stone\brand has a good quality? 

    what's the right stone grit for the steel of my knifes? maybe a combo stone 600\1000? or 400\1000?
     
  4. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    I am moving this discussion to a knife forum, where it will get more attention from knife enthusiasts.

    Luko, please return to the New User Introductions and tell us about yourself if you like. We would love to hear about your cooking!

    Cheers,

    Mezzaluna
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    There are a number of threads on sharpening. Most people here will recommend you learn to sharpen free hand and likely on natural stones. 

    If you want to handle it more simply, there are a few machines from Chef's Choice that will put an acceptable edge on your blade. However, they tend to sharpen aggressively so your knife will wear faster over all compared to other techniques. 

    Jig systems are also available, the Edge Pro is the pinnacle of these. This tends to be slow for sharpening 10" chefs knives but will produce high quality edges. 

    Similarly, the Spyderco Sharpmaker will produce a pretty good edge too, but without the refinement of stones or the Edge Pro. Faster than the Edge Pro, slower than stones. Still much faster than the Cook's Illustrated review illustrates IMHO. I don't know how they screwed up using it as its pretty foolproof, but their experience and mine are at complete odds with this tool. 
     
  6. vexedosito

    vexedosito

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    What's a non-stone sharpener that I can use to get my mercer knives to 15 degrees??
     
  7. benuser

    benuser

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    With soft stainless I would start by thinning (making a relief bevel) at some 10 degree until burr formation, this using coarse sandpaper (P120). Then deburr at an edge @ 20 degree per side with some a bit finer abrasive, e.g. a relatively coarse ceramic steel (JIS 800).
     
  8. benuser

    benuser

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    With soft stainless I would start by thinning (making a relief bevel) at some 10 degree until burr formation, this using coarse sandpaper (P120), edge trailing only. Then deburr by very light edge leading at an edge @ 20 degree per side with some a bit finer abrasive, e.g. a relatively coarse ceramic steel (JIS 800).