Heres my 2 cents

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Why are you going to go to a culinary school to learn how to cook? Granted, Culinary schools do give you a slight edge (very slight) The only reason why I say that is there are a few minor certifications that you get with the criculum. They are easliy attainable on your own.  On the job experience is the only way to make it in the restaurant world. If you just want to be a line cook thats fine. If you want to have your own place here is the best adivse that I can offer you both old and young! GET A BA DEGREE OR HIGHER IN BUSINESS AND MAJOR IN MARKETING!  

The mastery of kitchen work does not make a successfull restaurant. It is the numbers, location, and marketing that make the restaurant go! Now, you do have to use common knowledge in running a kitchen. This is where experience comes into play, use someone elses resources and endeavours (dreams) to fuel your passion. in other words gain as much experience as you can before you swim on your own.

In my own thoughts, Culinary Arts Schools are for general people who want to go play home economics for a few hours a day! Dont waste your time and hard earned money! 
 
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      I agree. Im 22, At first i wanted to go to culinary school because i wanted to have the most knowledge to launch into my career with. I figured that going to culinary school would show that im more passionate than just any line cook. But as i did more research into it i figured out that its kind of a jip. I talked to chefs where i work and none of them went to culinary school. My sous chef, who is a 5 star class chef, never went. He told me all the chefs he knew that went ended up regretting it.

    Its not going to give you a higher pay when you go to get a job. I know a girl that went to CIA in New York, which is probably the most "prestigious" culinary school in America. Tuition is about 70,000 if i remember correctly. After she graduated she got a job starting out making 12 an hour, after a few years she got bumped up to 16 an hour. Thats pretty standard pay. Ive only been a cook for about 7 months now, working at a college cafeteria , and now i just got a job at the Ritz Carlton making 13 an hour, no culinary school. And ive done events in Miami, where i made almost 20 an hour just to do plating on the day of the event, and 16 an hour just to cut shrimp the two prep days before.

I just dont see how its worth it. These schools are not cheap. Le cordon bleu miami is 19,000 for tuition, and lincoln in palm beach is 40,000 tuition. And for what? you get no degree and you get payed the exact same amount as someone without any culinary school. The only real benefit to culinary school is you get alot of connections and get to network with a lot of like minded people around the same age as you.

I plan on being a restaurateur in the future, which is why i decided to get a BA in Hospitality Management. They teach you the business side of things and you also get some cooking classes. Get yourself a real degree, not a certification. 
 
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I just joined this forum and I'm sad to see trolls even on a culinary forum. Thanks for your two cents!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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Hospitality Management. Talk about a waste of money! Do a survey and I'll bet you a dinner that maybe 1 restaurateur out of 100  has a B in Hospitality Manage.

The best Culinary school I know of is totally free to people in the community. 
 
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The degree doesnt make you succesful, its how you apply it. But youre always at an advantage over other people when you have an education and a degree

and please do feel free to tell me where this culinary school is.
 
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The degree doesnt make you succesful, its how you apply it. But youre always at an advantage over other people when you have an education and a degree

and please do feel free to tell me where this culinary school is.
School DOES give an advantage that experience doesn't provide.

There are every day examples that I can site that provide evidence of this.

Math

Writing skills

Spelling

communication skills

Sounds silly right?

Okay, so you might say to yourself, but Chef these are things taught in high school and before.

To this I'll then answer with a question.  

Then how come in my career, I have had so many employees and co-workers who can't measure, (don't how many ounces in a cup/quart/gallon).

Or can't read a recipe and double it, or worse yet, can't even write a note to the Chef without several misspelled words, or no punctuation.

Culinary school is so much more then learning to cook. Paying attention in high school to the basics continues on in higher learning.

How many of you who have taken courses in college have witnessed what I've just described?

We have all been there with co-workers, peers, even management, who lack basic skills in math, reading, and writing.

So when someone says to me that they have experience over school, I can see what they have learned and what they lack by watching and listening.
 
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You are right on Chefross.  Many companies have a "glass ceiling" for those without a BS.  If trying to get a loan or investors to start a business a BS with business and marketing goes a long way.
 
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Some of the dumbest people I know have college degrees. I just had to explain to one yesterday what half and half was. Can't even make change.
 
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I'm just referring to hashbrownclown and freddy12712.

1st. HBC,   the degree in Business or Marketing

2nd. Fred   the degree in Hotel management.

Culinary School is basically a technical step into the profession.

There is a certain mindset that an Entrepreneur has. It certainly does not require any type of degree. Sure the Sheepskin may look good on the wall in your office, but a lot of the times it has nothing to do what the entrepreneur does or has.  I believe it comes from vision, passion and most of all, risk taking. Look around at some of the successful entrepreneurs who don't have a degree and may have dropped out of regular school to follow their vision. Net worths of People like Richard Branson-5+ Billion, Steve Jobs-15 Billion, Larry Ellison-50-60 Billion, Mike Dell-20+ Billion, 

Rachael Ray-60+Million, Wendy's Dave T-99 Million. None of these people have degrees in anything.

I know this sounds contradictory but I also think higher education is a great place to figure out what your vision and passions might be if you don't have one..

My2 cents

BTW  Ownership and entrepreneurship I think go hand in hand. Ownership in this country is very attainable, you grow into an entrepreneur. That ownership does not have to be successful for you to move on. Most successful people have failures. The failures are usually your education.
 
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"Don't fight play nice".

We should be here to learn and discuss.  We should be a good example for students and those just starting out.  Panini please stick with us I enjoy reading your posts.

Freddy2712, at twenty dollars and hour your still making less than fifty thousand a year.  One national chain is offering graduates with a B.S. forty eight  to fifty five thousand to train.  After six months they offer sixty five and above.  That is for a forty hour week.
 
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The degree doesn't make you succesful, its how you apply it. But youre always at an advantage over other people when you have an education and a degree

and please do feel free to tell me where this culinary school is.
Hi Freddy......

I'm a big believer in "acid tests" and I have two such tests for you to consider:

The first is with entrepreneurs.  Here, the test is very simple, a person with a fresh degree is sitting across from a bank manager or someone who will loan you money to start your first venture.  IMHO, and in almost everyone who has contributed to this thread, the bank manager will not be impressed with the degree unless it is backed up with some kind of related work experience.  See, a car is no good without gasoline, and a degree is no good without "skin in the game".

The second is a culinary school graduate applying for a cooking job.  The chef, or H.R. officer will almost always be non-plussed with culinary school degrees, and will rely on the first 4 hours of you being in the kitchen to decide if you stay or not.

In short, degrees only tell people that you've been to school.  It's what you do with your life that decides if you will be successful.

(p.s.  I used the spell checker on my post, but it started on your quote first and picked up several mistakes.  I started to correct them, but then figured w.t.f. it's your post, not mine.......,.)
 
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(p.s.  I used the spell checker on my post, but it started on your quote first and picked up several mistakes.  I started to correct them, but then figured w.t.f. it's your post, not mine.......,.)
I was referencing chefross's comments about people not having spelling or math skills. I was being facetious. 

There are many ways to enter fields of one's choice. Some go the education route, others the "experience is everything" route. You simply cannot dismiss one path outright over the other. Everybody has an opinion based on life choices, and everybody is different. Every situation is different. 

I've encountered "dumb" and "smart" from both degreed and non-degreed people alike. Some people feel entitled because they have a degree, but don't have the smarts or experience to back it up. I've also found experienced, pushy, defensive people without degrees unable to find their way out of a paper bag. Sometimes the path is a matter of finances, and for others a matter of intellectual capacity. Both have their advantages and disadvantages, and to each their own. And then there is the wild card of luck and the environment you find yourself in. . .

People find success in different ways, but all necessitate hard work and perseverance. Some are just lucky. 

Sorry you were offended Panini. Not my intention. I might have inadvertently found an ideological judgement on your part where there was none. 
 
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I was referencing chefross's comments about people not having spelling or math skills. I was being facetious. 

There are many ways to enter fields of one's choice. Some go the education route, others the "experience is everything" route. You simply cannot dismiss one path outright over the other. Everybody has an opinion based on life choices, and everybody is different. Every situation is different. 

I've encountered "dumb" and "smart" from both degreed and non-degreed people alike. Some people feel entitled because they have a degree, but don't have the smarts or experience to back it up. I've also found experienced, pushy, defensive people without degrees unable to find their way out of a paper bag. Sometimes the path is a matter of finances, and for others a matter of intellectual capacity. Both have their advantages and disadvantages, and to each their own. And then there is the wild card of luck and the environment you find yourself in. . .

People find success in different ways, but all necessitate hard work and perseverance. Some are just lucky. 

Sorry you were offended Panini. Not my intention. I might have inadvertently found an ideological judgement on your part where there was none. 
Um... I was quoting from Freddy's post, #5, and I acknowledged this by addressing Freddy directly.

In any case, I can only partially agree with Freddy's statement . 

It's true, Chance does favour the prepared mind, and education is a great way to prepare yourself.  But having a university degree does not automatically guarantee you a successful career.   Just look at any Stah-buck's, at least one barista will have a Bach. of arts, or a degree in Pol. Science.  Yet the degree isn't doing much to pay the rent, and it's not much of an advantage over the "other guy" who is willing to work evenings and weekends.

However Freddy is spot-on when he writes "the degree isn't what makes you successful, it's how you apply it".  Couldn't agree more.
 
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It's true, Chance does favour the prepared mind,
Not sure I agree with this. I've heard : luck is where preparation and opportunity meet. It is a nifty, oft use phrase to justify actions by those that succeed. It doesn't take into account those that prepare, work, and do everything necessary, and yet still find themselves outside looking in.

If that phrase had any merit, we, as inhabitants of the planet, would be able to "do" something to prevent getting hit by an asteroid the size of of Pluto. 
 
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Hmmmmm,

But then again, wouldn't it take a prepared mind to realize that "an asteroid the size of Pluto" is coming straight at us?

No wonder those dinosaurs never had a chance......

Hey, just messing with you.  I'm on my final stretch of my "annual christmas marathon"  Straight 12 hr days since Dec. 6th, and 10 hr days on my day off.  So I am a bit snappy and punch drunk....

But then again, what does asteroids and Pluto have to do with kids declaring that culinary school is for eejits,and that hospt. mngmt degrees are the only way to go?  Who's gonna hire a degree holder with rest. mngmt experience?  Or is some bank mngr going approve a loan for some kid (albeit with a degree) with no experience to speak of, other than shucking shrimp @ $16/hr?  

Coffee break's over, weider an die Arbeit,  it's another 3 days before I can actually get some sleep.....
 
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Oh-oh.. My bad,  I should have wrote:

"Who's gonna hire a degree holder with NO rest. mngmt. experience?"
 
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Who, him? 

His luxury hotel/tower is nearing completion here in Vancouver, and our Mayor and councilors are voting on if they should remove his name all together from the building's signage when it opens.  If they can't do that, then they'll at least remove the "t" from his name ......
 
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