Herbs

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cape chef, Dec 4, 2000.

  1. cape chef

    cape chef

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    For the past 15-20 years I have always had a herb garden. As small as growing in coffee tins to as large as 30 by 30. I have finished cutting back my perranials and pulled up my annuals. I have fed the soil in hopes of a good spring growth. Pulled in some tender perranials (rosemary) to pick fresh in the winter. My favorites are Thyme,Rosemary,sage,oregano,Marjarom in all there different subs- as well as many types of mints, chocolate,pineapple,lemon,orange. I also love my French Tarragon and Chives for Perranials. Lemon Verbena'Basil (10 kinds) Camimille are what I like for annuals
    I used the flowers from Pineapple sage this year for garnish, Thin bell shaped, deep red in color and sweet. As winter approches in New England I can't wait till spring! So what are your favorite herbs and why?
    cc
     
  2. isa

    isa

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    Can I cheat a little and say herbes de Provence? It goes well into just about anything.


    Otherwise I'll say thyme, rosemary and sage. I like the smell of tarragon but beside chicken tarragon and bearnaise I never know what to put it in.
     
  3. cape chef

    cape chef

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    sisi, When I poach seafood in court bouillon I include tarragon. Also most of the foods I prepare with a Mediterranean base tarragon goes well, I love it with citrus as well, and have done roasted pears with blue cheese stuffing warm baklava with loquat and tarragon ice. Did this for a dessert wine tasting. Sounds strange-But taste awfully good with 86 Doisy ver Danes
    cc
     
  4. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Loquats cool...I love loquats!!! they grew in Baton Rouge...havn't seen them here.
    I do a herb day cooking demo at a Perennial Farm every May and they send me out with a flat to fill for my home use...
    Basil sweet and purple (mainly for garnish)
    Thyme lemon and english
    Tarragon...I use it alot...salad dressings, fish sauces, chicken salad, some pork dishes.
    Rosemary...it's still alive even in the snow
    parsley..flatleaf
    lemon verbena
    nastursiums...they do not thrive in my hands
    lemon grass...I love lemon grass
    I use alot of dillweed but don't grow it
    HMMMM that's all that comes to mind right now
    oh yeah I also raise lavender...it does not really grow well for me.
     
  5. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Oh yeah Lavender!! Duh Bradski,,
    Shroomgirl do you grow your own lemongrass?
    cc
     
  6. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Yep grows very well here as well as Baton Rouge......One of the few things that I have an overabundance of....the others I get every year thinking THIS will be the year that I do not kill nasturtiums or lavender...herbacide....nono please don't buy me you killed everyone of us you got the past 20 years......it's a sad thing...
     
  7. momoreg

    momoreg

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    You could put cilantro on just about anything, and I'd eat it.
     
  8. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Cilantro is a tough one to raise. It goes to seed and needs to be replanted every two weeks. It used to make me ill just smelling it but I got over it....Breadfruit is another thing. Apparently these to have chemicals that give people that reaction.There are actually signs in Asia that have a picture with a slash mark through it....
     
  9. isa

    isa

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    How could I forget salmon and tarragon. It's my favourite too. Thanks Cape Chef.

    I grow herbs on my balcony during the summer. two flower box full of herbs. At the end of the summer I always try to transplant the rosemary, thyme, chives and basil so I can have fresh herbs during the winter. It never works, they always end up dying after a few weeks. I'll start a indoor herb garden next spring
     
  10. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Great topic!

    I just started 2 years ago with great success and am addicted. I'm most endeared to my little bay laurel. It doubled in size this summer and I hope it's going to become a wonderful tree one day.

    My herb garden includes watercress, chervil, curry, cilantro, flatleaf parsley, dill, sage (reg, tri color, golden, and purple), basil, opal basil, creeping thyme, mother of thyme, French tarragon, chives, garlic chives, mints, catnip, scallions, edible ornamental hot red peppers, oregano, marjoram, lemon verbena, cilantro, and rosemary.

    Gosh, we love them all. For the best baguette sandwhich you've ever had, try this [​IMG] : slice a baguette in half lengthwise, spread mayo along the bottom. Then top with fresh basil leaves, chopped black olives, sliced roma tomatoes (or oven roasted, herb infused, oil cured tomatoes), salt & pepper in that order. Watercress is fun and makes delicious soup.

    shroomgirl, my favorite scent in the world is lemongrass [​IMG]. Do you grow it from seed? No pesto from your basil?

    MaryeO, where have you been growing your herbs? Basil needs full sun all day to flourish [​IMG] , as with most herbs.

    Don't know if I have a favorite cape chef, it's like picking your favorite child. Each has its own intrinsic qualities.

    I'm still hanging on to most all my herbs inside. Tough when there is only one good south facing window. I think I'm going to have to sterilize and refertilize my soil though. I never did do anything before I brought them indoors to de bug them.

    I'll have to cut them back today [​IMG].

    Does anyone dry their herbs on a regular basis? [​IMG] If so, how do you do it? I've heard of several methods: cool dark place in flat baskets for air circulation, food dehydrators, microwave, wrap in touille and put in crisper in fridge...
     
  11. isa

    isa

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  12. isa

    isa

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    where can I join the SPCH ??

    [​IMG]
     
  13. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Very funny Maryeo [​IMG]
    I dry my herbs by first washing them and patting them dry. I then bunch them together like a bouquet, tie them with twin And hang them upside down in my celler. This method works well for me and my celler smells nice to boot!
    cc
     
  14. cape chef

    cape chef

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    I have the same problem with Cilantro. I just don't think it likes the Northeast. As soon as I plant it It seems to go to seed. However I do dry the seeds and use for Coriander. But I could not live without Cilantro in my salsa"s. Mareo In a weird way like Saffron-To much Cilantro is offensive,just the right amount is wonderful and refreshing
    cc
     
  15. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Yep Durian it is....UGH I get physically sick for hours with just one sniff.

    Basil I use alot of....just purple is used as garnish.

    Lemongrass from a plant not seeds.

    Was that it on the questions? I think I got them all.
     
  16. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Baton Rouge in an oriental ethnic store...cookies I opened the bag and then threw them out the window.

    Dierbergs grocery store here had slices on meat trays covered in plastic, one sniff and literally I was ill...stomach churning for hours. Weirdest thing. No way would I try again....WHY?
     
  17. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Some people say that Durian is heavenly, if you can get past the smell. I'm not sure who thinks it's heavenly, but I bought a Durian once, and I thought it was sorta good. My husband tried it, and was not at all enchanted. I would buy it again, but it's way too big for just one person..
     
  18. cookm

    cookm

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    What does durian smell like anyway? Everyone says it smells horrible, but how? Does it smell like a dump on a hot day? Fetid feet? A very dirty cat box???? Come on, tell me...

    My fave herbs: thyme, parsley, MARJORAM!!(how 'bout that marjoram?), mint (esp. chocolate mint), and sage. I'm lucky here in the Bay Area, and I'm doubly lucky cause my roomies are lanscapers and I have a beautiful garden. Oh, and lemon verbena--especially after the lemon verbena and mint tisane I had.
     
  19. mudbug

    mudbug

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    According to www.foodsubs.com

    durian = stinky fruit

    Notes: The weird and smelly durian has attracted a cult-like following. It's called the King of Fruits by aficionados in Southeast Asia, but Westerners usually don't care much for its mild oniony flavor. Once cut open, the durian gives off such a strong and foul odor that it's banned on Singaporean subways. Look for it in Asian markets. The boiled seeds of the durian are called betons.

    There is a picture here:
    http://www.foodsubs.com/Fruittroex.html
     
  20. isa

    isa

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    What amazed me is all the fruits and vegetables that have appeared on the market in the last 20 years.