Henckels 5 Star Santoku vs Wusthof Ikon

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Joined Dec 24, 2018
Hello all, this is my first post, so go easy ;) I'm an enthusiastic home cook in Scotland with no real training, other than reading and YT videos.

I mainly use a Henckels 5 Star 7" santoku (https://www.zwilling.com/us/zwillin...ntoku---visual-imperfections/30048-180-5.html - this one). I like it, including the handle shape and light weight/balance, but it doesn't really hold an edge all that well.

I was almost tempted to try Dalstrong or Zelite but, after doing a bit of reading, I was put off by their apparent quality control issues (which I should have expected with their spec vs price). I'm itching for a new knife, but I'm a little stuck. I know santokus aren't very popular on here, mostly because people seem to feel that a cook's knife is more productive. My knife skills are probably mediocre, I suppose, and I find the 10" cook's knife I've got to be a little unwieldy. Food also sticks to it a fair bit more than the hollow santoku. Having said that, the cook's knife is of low-to-middling quality and I feel I should suspend judgement of other such knives of better quality.

So, to finally get to the point: do I stick with the santoku style and try the Wusthof Ikon version? Or should I just try to improve my knife skills with something like a Wusthof 8" cook's knife? I like the look of these and they've had good reviews, not to mention that the handle style would suit me. I know they're slightly harder than Henckels knives, but shouldn't be as brittle as something like a Damascus blade.

To answer the normal follow-up questions: I have a 1000/6000 whetstone. I cut with a pinch-grip style, and I use a plastic board of around A3 size (I fancy swapping to a decent wooden block). Thanks for your help!

Scott
 
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Nothing wrong with a santoku, but why a Zwilling or Wüsthof? The Krupp's 4116 they both use doesn't take or hold very fine edges. For commercial reasons they got delivered with edges they barely hold.
Better look for a short gyuto or santoku with Japanese makers. Thinner geometry, not as handle heavy as the Germans. Have a look at the Misono 440and UX-10 series with Korin. Ask for their free initial stone sharpening.
If you're OK with carbon steel, Robert Herder, Solingen has a very nice santoku named Lignum 3.
 
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Joined Dec 24, 2018
I picked up the Henckels a couple of years ago for about £30, which was pretty good value, and I just like the look of the Wustof Ikon range. I also like the Japanese style, but I've struggled to decide on a brand that is genuinely good quality, without costing too much: my budget is around £140). I've got no issue with carbon. The santoku I've got isn't very handle-heavy at all, and I do like that, so maybe I should check out a gyuto. Thanks.
 
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
Eventually pick up a King 300 stone so you can do some thinning. After polishing German knives to 6K for many years I decided that 1K was really where to stop for ordinary prep work. I always sharpen acute and then finish with an obtuse microbevel using stropping strokes on a clean stone.
 
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Joined Dec 24, 2018
Eventually pick up a King 300 stone so you can do some thinning. After polishing German knives to 6K for many years I decided that 1K was really where to stop for ordinary prep work. I always sharpen acute and then finish with an obtuse microbevel using stropping strokes on a clean stone.

Hi Rick, thanks for the reply. What made you come to the conclusion that you should stop at 1000? I'll check out the 300 stone, thanks.
 
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Crap Krupp steel cannot support a thin edge nor can it retain a keen edge, if used at all for board work. 1K done right will give you some tooth to keep you cutting, as Benuser has frequently admonished. I do have luck using a 6K for the microbeveling, but I really think the 6K I have is actually much coarser than the claimed grade, I know the Geshin 5k stone is definitely finer.

Let me emphasize that when you do the stropping part to use a clean stone, ie, no mud. otherwise you might pull a wire (new burr).

You might also look at a Tanaka VG-10. They are only slightly over budget, Tanaka does VG-10 much better than others, and it is said to be a hell of a lot of knife for the money. Trouble is finding them in stock.
 
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Believe it or not, my wife bought me a Wuesthof Classic Ikon 8" cook's and 9cm paring set for Xmas. I think I'd best give them a try for the sake of world peace! I'll look at Japanese knives in the near future. Given what you've already said, I've look at some King stones: the most common that I've found available in the UK are 1000/6000 - so not much use, and the same grit as what I've already got (albeit better quality). I have, however found the following:




Would any of those be good additions to the 1000/6000 I already have? Thanks again!

Scott
 
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Joined Dec 24, 2018
Ah, the links seem to have been removed. One of the combi stones I found was a King 250/1000: would the 250 be too course, or would that be suitable?
 
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Will be OK, just don't get close enough to the edge to raise a burr, it is a rough stone. Keep a low angle with it.
 
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Joined Jan 25, 2019
Can anyone share experience with the Henckels CLASSIC 7" Hollow Edge Santoku Knife (suggested by this article)? The knife seems to have better price and feedbacks as well.

Thanks!
 
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Joined Jan 31, 2019
Can anyone share experience with the Henckels CLASSIC 7" Hollow Edge Santoku Knife (suggested by this article)? The knife seems to have better price and feedbacks as well.

Thanks!
I had two of them (broke one accidentally so I bought a new one). For home cook, it works perfectly, but for the industry, it works well for the first two months, then it starts chipping here and there. I only use it for prepping veggies and meat, no bones so no idea how it got chipped like that
 
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You'll find little love for Henkles products of the "classic" German steel referred to as Krupp 4116, what most German knives are made of including the classic line mentioned. Though unexceptional knives and steel in general, the one good thing 4116 is known for is toughness. It will bend, deform and otherwise tweek, but chipping is almost unheard of.
 
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Joined Jan 31, 2019
I have the King 1000/6000 Combo and it works well, i also have Spyderco 8 inch finishing stone between the King 6000 and the Spyderco fine stone i get what i feel is a really sharp blade.
 
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