Help with choosing whetstone please.

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Joined Jun 7, 2015
Ok guys so I'm reading through this thread , brilliant stuff, only problem for me is I'm looking for good stones, and some guiding rails, now two things ,only things I can find abundants of in UK is man made stones, not naturally, and they are stupidly over priced, so I'm looking for waterstones that are not going to cost me a weeks pay , and do a professional job good enough for a chef with almost a ocd problem as I take pride in looking after my knives, even the misses sometimes gets a bit gealus of the knives I can imagine.

So my quistions

1 ) reppable suppliers
2) your recomendations.
 
2,866
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
So this is not exactly a dead post resurrection.

I understand these guys get around the import tax issues, or at least did. http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/WhetStonesForSale.html#Whetstone

Tools from Japan is another company to try.  They have a great deal on a 3-stone kit, even includes an Atoma diamond plate for flattening.

http://www.toolsfromjapan.com/store...oduct_info&cPath=335_404_403&products_id=1667

Would be better for some if it were 400/1K/6K stones instead of 1K/6K/13K.  Nice to have the high-polish stone though and you could always add a 400.

Rick
 
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Ok looks great , I don't mind the idea of the higher grit in fact I love the idea, I've never heard of these stones though sushiro was it, can you personally reccomemd them, as I'm looking for quality I won't be too bothered about paying the money just I don't want to spend money on stones and find out they won't do well for the masamoto knives I'm looking to buy, which at the minute I'm using global and a wustof ikon, also while your here , can I also ask what's the difference between the hard stones and soft sharpening wise, I understand one will wear a lot more, but any thing different about the finish with the blade?
 
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
Soft or hard, the quality of the stone factors in greatly.  Comparing apples to apples in terms of quality, the softer stones will cut faster because of the constant supply of new grit, but of course they will dish faster.  Not a problem really, though many pro sharpeners will go for the harder stones as they last longer and require less flattening.  Some very hard stones in the high-grit range, like Shaptons, exhibit less feedback, considered a negative.  Shaptons also run coarser than other stones, so an 8K Shapton would behave more like a 6k in comparison to some others.

I don't have personal experience with the stones I mentioned, but the Sigma power stones are well regarded in other forums more focused on such things. When comes the time for new stones/additions myself, I would go with the Geshin line available Stateside, they are rather pricey.  I'm also collecting materials to experiment with various stopping substrates and compounds, but these are also being acquired Stateside.

Japanese Natural Stones is another possible source, they do carry synthetic stones.

Iminishi is a very good and modestly priced stone.  CKTG used to carry a set including the Iminishi 400, Niniwa Green  Brick (2K) and Snow White (8K), which would also make a nice and reasonably priced set.

Rick
 
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Joined Jan 8, 2015
Any tips on removing scuffs from the side of the blade?

Also, once an edge is formed, I think it's rather easy to hold that angle, any tips for holding the angle when creating a new edge?
 
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Joined Apr 25, 2014
Scratching up your blade face is part of sharpening.  I thin as I go along, which means the knife is at a very low angle, very nearly flat.  Any scratches from normal sharpening are also going to hit the stone in your thinning, progressively going up to finer grits.  Other than using your stones that way,  sometimes I put on a nitrile glove, and grab some of that slurry from sharpening and rub it on the bladeface.  There's also fingerstones or wet dry sandpaper.  It really depends on the knife if I care about looks or not.  At the very least, I take out scratches if they are rough and creating drag when I cut.

For holding an angle, watch the JKI video:


TLDR:  right hand holds the angle.  Left hand applies pressure, pushes and pulls

Also if you're setting a bevel different than what's on there, it helps to use a coarser stone.  Then you don't need to hold that angle for as long.
 
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One more thing. One of my stones came attached to a cheap plastic stand with tiny rubber feet that does a horrible job of keeping it stationary. What's the best method for removing the stone from the stand?
 
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Has any one here used the sigma stones from tools from Japan, they have 5 reviews on there website all 5 stars but they was some a year back so minds may have changed.
 
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
Sorry no, but they really don't get any bad reviews, and the price of those sets is hard to be beat.  Just read carefully what the choices are for mixing and matching.  The 400 Atoma is probably a good choice as it will double for the course stone, and you don't want to mess with anything rougher in a diamond plate unless you have some experience.  And the super hard stones are not for kitchen knives.

Rick
 
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Because the australian custom is very strict on goods related to nature, are you sure its okay to bring them?
 
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If you are that concerned, you should purchase from an Aus vendor like the ones I listed above...

Not to mention, we are talking about synthetic (man-made) whetstones when you see brands like Sigma Power, Naniwa, Shapton, King, Imanishi/Bester, Suehiro, etc.
 
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I have a question, will whestone get confiscated in the custom in australian airport?

Synthetic or natural?

In theory, at least, synthetics ought to be okay.

Naturals, not so much: some of them really are from nearly played-out mines, and I could see restrictions being in place.

Of course, I'm in the US, where they make up rules as they go along in order to show everyone they're in authority, so what do I know?
 
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