Help plz prover question.

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Joined Oct 4, 2017
Hi chef, I'm using a old manual prover. I set the temperature around 39 degree and humidity 40 degree to last proff my buns.Am I setting it right? Plz help
The bun is wet. Help me
 
113
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Joined May 30, 2015
It's wet before you bake it or after? Are you baking it long enough? What type of bread are you baking, and how are you baking it?

Just in my experience, I've always prefered an overnight proof in the walk-in with a 1-3 hour proof at room temp the next day over using a proofer box.
 
20
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Joined Oct 4, 2017
It's wet before you bake it or after? Are you baking it long enough? What type of bread are you baking, and how are you baking it?

Just in my experience, I've always prefered an overnight proof in the walk-in with a 1-3 hour proof at room temp the next day over using a proofer box.

Baking sweet Bun. Bake around 6+5mins or until its golden brown on the top.
When I take out my buns from the prover it's wet. Then I eggwash it n bake. I don't have any walk in chiller. Just a small house refrigerator.
My method is
I make the sponge let it rest around 1.5 or 2 hrs. And mix the sponge with the remaining ingredient until got the window. Divide it into 55g each pcs then roll into balls. Keep them into freezer. Next day take them out de froze then shaping and prove n bake.
I'm setting the prover around 39-40 degree temperature. And the humidity around 40.
 
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Joined Sep 26, 2017
Your proofer probably needs calibrating.

You usually proof breads at 70-80% humidity, and they'd just be barely moistened.

@ 40% humidity, the dough should be relatively dry.

By the way, where do you live? 40°C is a bit too hot a temperature.

The breads would proof much faster at a lower temperature.
 
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Joined Sep 25, 2018
Baking sweet Bun. Bake around 6+5mins or until its golden brown on the top.
When I take out my buns from the prover it's wet. Then I eggwash it n bake. I don't have any walk in chiller. Just a small house refrigerator.
My method is
I make the sponge let it rest around 1.5 or 2 hrs. And mix the sponge with the remaining ingredient until got the window. Divide it into 55g each pcs then roll into balls. Keep them into freezer. Next day take them out de froze then shaping and prove n bake.
I'm setting the prover around 39-40 degree temperature. And the humidity around 40.
You just said it: you are proofing the buns!

The best temperature for yeast to be activated and develop succesfully is from 28 to 32ºC. But if you can't get the dough to proof at this temperature, room temperature works just fine.

Since you're proofing it, this does not mean you are actually cooking it. After the first proofing stage, you need to portion them, let them rest for 10 minutes, mold your buns and let them proof for the second time but for a shorter period of time, after this you would decorate/score/brush them with egg wash and then bake your buns.

Follow these steps in your next batch of buns, Don't give up or rattled by top equipment (such as the proofer).

If you still have any doubt, reach me privately.

I look forward to know about your results.
 
20
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Joined Oct 4, 2017
Your proofer probably needs calibrating.

You usually proof breads at 70-80% humidity, and they'd just be barely moistened.

@ 40% humidity, the dough should be relatively dry.

By the way, where do you live? 40°C is a bit too hot a temperature.

The breads would proof much faster at a lower temperature.

My proffer is old n second hand. My boss get it from second hand shop. She doesn't know how to use them too. Ask me to figure it out. This is my first time using proffer actually. There's no % on it onky got the degrees on the humidity side. What's the temperature for 70%-80% humidity? (40% humidity is 40 degree? Am I right?) I'm setting the temperature around 39 - 40 degree.

I'm from malaysia.
 
20
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Joined Oct 4, 2017
You just said it: you are proofing the buns!

The best temperature for yeast to be activated and develop succesfully is from 28 to 32ºC. But if you can't get the dough to proof at this temperature, room temperature works just fine.

Since you're proofing it, this does not mean you are actually cooking it. After the first proofing stage, you need to portion them, let them rest for 10 minutes, mold your buns and let them proof for the second time but for a shorter period of time, after this you would decorate/score/brush them with egg wash and then bake your buns.

Follow these steps in your next batch of buns, Don't give up or rattled by top equipment (such as the proofer).

If you still have any doubt, reach me privately.

I look forward to know about your results.
You just said it: you are proofing the buns!

The best temperature for yeast to be activated and develop succesfully is from 28 to 32ºC. But if you can't get the dough to proof at this temperature, room temperature works just fine.

Since you're proofing it, this does not mean you are actually cooking it. After the first proofing stage, you need to portion them, let them rest for 10 minutes, mold your buns and let them proof for the second time but for a shorter period of time, after this you would decorate/score/brush them with egg wash and then bake your buns.

Follow these steps in your next batch of buns, Don't give up or rattled by top equipment (such as the proofer).

If you still have any doubt, reach me privately.

I look forward to know about your results.
Does that mean after mixing my dough with the sponge Dough. Divide them pcs and roll them into ball let them rest for ten mins. After ten mins shape them n proff for the last time.
 
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Joined Mar 4, 2015
From the sounds of things your humidity is set too high.

I don't ever turn on any heat setting when using a proofer, especially the stand alone cabinet proofers. The humidity usually set around just below the halfway mark provides enough warmth and humidity to properly proof. Keeping the dough from drying out is just as important as the dough proofing.

Depending on the dough, the longer you proof (something such as a lean dough) the more flavor you develop along the way. I am all in favor of cold proofing over night, and finishing with a bit of humidity in the morning. Sourdough in particular.
 
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