Help me put this in order

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kuan, Oct 21, 2001.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Variety of Canapes
    Potato bread rolls
    Breast of Quail and Duck Rillettes
    Crab bisque
    Shrimp sausage with mango and citrus beurre blanc
    Roast lamb loin with cabbage custard and (some other starch garnish)
    Roast monkfish with root vegetables
    Intermezzo
    Salad
    Dessert (non-chocolate type)
    Friandise and Coffee

    It's many courses, but total protein is about 10-11 oz only. This person wants a lot of seafood and I'm confused about what to serve when.

    :confused: Kuan:confused:
     
  2. isa

    isa

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    That is a lot of food. I think it should be divided by course ie fish course, poultrey, meat etc. Think I read that in the Larousse gastronomique about huge banquet.


    Variety of Canapes

    Crab bisque
    Potato bread rolls
    Roast monkfish with root vegetables
    Shrimp sausage with mango and citrus beurre blanc

    Intermezzo

    Breast of Quail and Duck Rillettes
    Roast lamb loin with cabbage custard and (some other starch garnish)

    Salad

    Dessert (non-chocolate type)
    Friandise and Coffee
     
  3. daveb

    daveb

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    Roast monkfish strikes me as being a bit robust for a traditional fish course. I'd be inclined to serve it as a main course, along with the meat and poultry.
     
  4. jim berman

    jim berman

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    I agree with Dave. The lamb loin should be the 'remove' and the fish is full-bodied enough to be the main dish. I think after that bisque and rolls, they are going to be some mighty-full bellies by the time dessert rolls around. Let us know how it turns out!!
     
  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    This is crazy. I should try and "remove" the monkfish. As it stands it looks and feels unbalanced and not very elegant. Or, who cares, I get paid right no?

    Kuan
     
  6. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I forget, the wine is also a problem. A Cabernet is going with the lamb and hopefully a full bodied Chardonnay with the monkfish. So it'd be real weird switching white-red-white. Bleh...

    Kuan
     
  7. jim berman

    jim berman

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    Kuan,

    The 'remove' is classically a joint-meat that is often carved or a 'bit' portion. Sorry for not clarifying.
     
  8. daveb

    daveb

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    Serving the Lamb as a remove does lead to a white-red-white alternation which some might find annoying. On the other hand, serving both the Quail and the Lamb as main courses leads to havng both a red and a white on the table at once, unless you feel that a Cabernet works with the quail.

    My inclination would be to lose the Monkfish. Alternately,you could prepare it in a sufficiently hearty suace to make the Cabernet an appropriate companion.
     
  9. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks everyone for chiming in. I DID "remove" the monkfish and everything was fine. :) The quail actually did end up with a Merlot (don't ask) and we ended up serving a Pinot Noir with the Lamb. (Don't ask) :)

    Sometimes one can only make suggestions and suck it up right? Thanks again for the support.

    Kuan