Help me choose a knife.

27
10
Joined Jul 8, 2014
Looking for a nice mini chef knife. Needs to rock. I cook in the alaskan bush so specialized sharpening is out of question so nothing extremely hard. I grip up on the blade. Prefer hollow ground. Looking to spend 200-300. Need something gorgeous that will last. Great sharpening skills. Am cooking in an open kitchen in upscale lodge so this knife needs to impress. I do like a little weight and of course must be well balanced.. And for love of god please dont suggest ulu haha. Thanks in advance :)
 
4,199
1,089
Joined Dec 18, 2010
Please clarify.  How small is "mini", and what kind of sharpening do you consider "specialized"?
 
Last edited:
27
10
Joined Jul 8, 2014
4 1/2 to 5 inches. And nothing to hard. For sharpening i got basically a tri stone where I work and it is in the bush so everything has to be flown in so multiple stones are a luxury i cant have. So basically no Damascus or generally anything to hard. And like i said i need a rocker.
 
63
15
Joined Dec 6, 2013
Rocking with what is basically a petty knife? I don't quite see how that is supposed to work ...
 

phatch

Moderator
Staff member
9,585
1,104
Joined Mar 29, 2002
You sound like the kind of person who would like a particular set of knives from New West Knifeworks. 


http://www.newwestknifeworks.com/pr...0-line/chopper-chef-knife-fusionwood-20-/3563

I've used one. It's well built, sharp. Not my preference in a cooking blade, but where you want something with some ulu-like tendencies, this seems to be a good match. They have a smaller one too, but it's too small imho. 

This might be on the harder side of steels than what you're thinking of though. 
 
Last edited:
4,199
1,089
Joined Dec 18, 2010
I'm struggling with understanding how you would use such a short knife in a professional kitchen.  Last Christmas I bought a cermic knife about like that for my 10-year old son.  He now complains that it is too short for helping me prep a home-cooked dinner.  Sharp but too short for good leverage or "slide" when dealing with anything bigger than a herb.

Are you sure?  Only you know your needs, but I feel compelled to ask...  in Alaska I would assume that you'll be prepping/slicing moose or elk or other large animals.

I'm not sure that anything shorter than 10 inches will "impress the guests".  When I want to impress folks I pull out an old 12 inch carbon steel "no-name piece of crap but bleedingly sharp" blade.  That never fails to impress folks!   :)
 

phatch

Moderator
Staff member
9,585
1,104
Joined Mar 29, 2002
This is a woods kitchen it sounds like. More in the lines of Horace Kephart, or Nessmuk, cookery.
 
27
10
Joined Jul 8, 2014
I'm struggling with understanding how you would use such a short knife in a professional kitchen.  Last Christmas I bought a cermic knife about like that for my 10-year old son.  He now complains that it is too short for helping me prep a home-cooked dinner.  Sharp but too short for good leverage or "slide" when dealing with anything bigger than a herb.

Are you sure?  Only you know your needs, but I feel compelled to ask...  in Alaska I would assume that you'll be prepping/slicing moose or elk or other large animals.

I'm not sure that anything shorter than 10 inches will "impress the guests".  When I want to impress folks I pull out an old 12 inch carbon steel "no-name piece of crap but bleedingly sharp" blade.  That never fails to impress folks!   :)




Does it help to know I have a whole set of knives? Basically I need an ulu with a handle like a standard knife. I prefer Japanese handles. I use a smaller knife for fine work. I need it to rock so I can also use it for herbs. And nothing beats a short knife for pulling fat off a griz or brown bear. Also works well to trim up some moose, but it won't be used for moose to often because moose is already trim.
 

phatch

Moderator
Staff member
9,585
1,104
Joined Mar 29, 2002
If it helps, the owner of New West told me he's used this particular design for processing elk before. 
 
57
11
Joined Nov 2, 2013
Do you use an ulo for cooking in Alaska? We have them in Greenland as well but we never use them for cooking.

Traditionally they were used for seals. They are designed for cutting things on the ground while standing.

Mikael
 
27
10
Joined Jul 8, 2014
Do you use an ulo for cooking in Alaska? We have them in Greenland as well but we never use them for cooking.

Traditionally they were used for seals. They are designed for cutting things on the ground while standing.

Mikael
Here they use ulu's for everything. It amazing to watch i just personally dont like how they sit in my hand

Thanks for the additional info. Sounds like a fascinating job you have. I'm jealous!

Its a fun gig. I get to work i. A remote lodge that has more equipment and better stocked then 99% of professional town kitchens ive been in. The owners view is make the chef happy and the chef makes the guests paying thousands of dollars happy. Whats really nice is I get total menu freedom. If years ago when I started you told me id have to move to bush alaska to become a well known chef id have thought you were crazy but here i sit.
 
27
10
Joined Jul 8, 2014
Thanks everyone! And a special thanks to phatch for turning me onto those new west blades. I'm thinking that they will do nicely to fill the gap of my kit. Hopefully they ship fast cause I got two and half weeks til i ship out to the hunting resort.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top Bottom