Help buying a new chef knife

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by milkman420, Jan 11, 2017.

  1. milkman420

    milkman420

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    Hi I'm new here. I'm a professional chef and looking to turn in my wusthoff ikon for a Japanese knife. I don't know much about them but went to Williams and Sonoma to feel the shuns and loved the way they felt in my hand. Ive read several users say not to go with shun but all I can find in stores is shun and Miyabi. Which knife do you guys recommend as an everyday chef knife. My price point is 250$. My friend swears by his misono Swedish steel. I was looking more for a Damascus finish tho cuz to be honest they look cool. I don't care if it's carbon or stainless even tho from what I hear carbon is the way to go. I have above average sharpening skills. I just really want a solid knife to start a new collection. I'd use it for fish vegetables and other everyday tasks. I'm particularly looking for something bigger than 6" but smaller than 10". As of right now I've looked into the miyabi 5000mcd shun kanji/Fuji and misono ux10 and Swedish steel which is what I would get if the damn thing had a Damascus finish sigh:( lol. Hope to hear some feedback on those knives and some other knives to consider thanks in advance
     
  2. foody518

    foody518

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    I Just Like Food
    Have you looked at Gonbei Hammered Damacus?

    The Misono Swedish is a good knife. Not lasery by any means. Asymmetrical grind - The convexed outer blade face helps with food separation. Profile is lovely and sharpening is quick. Patina is your friend here
     
  3. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    First, I will tell you something about damascus.   Aside from the big 'come steal me' looks problem, flashy stainless damascus when it is scratched up looks like sh%^ .   Be prepared to spend time learning how to polish your knife if you want to keep the looks.  If you are okay to drop it you will find a LOT of great cutters in your price range.  I happen to think stainless pattern welded damascus cladding looks tacky...

    You'll find japanese are going to be a lot lighter especially if you get a wa handle type.    A 240mm gyuto is lighter and more nimble than your wusthof.  My feeling is 270mm is more useful for big vegetable prep if space is not an issue.
     
  4. foody518

    foody518

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    ^^^

    These soft stainless clad knives with the blade faces taken to a high level of polish shows scratches VERY easily. General usage, scrubby side of a sponge, taking in and out of most blade guards and sheaths -> some scratching. 
     
  5. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Cook At Home
    Maintenance issues noted along with subtlety of aesthetic, there are some very good reasonably priced performers in Damascus, Takayuki uses AEB-L Swedish stainless and the Geshin Gonbei uses 19C27 Swedish, AEB-L gets a little sharper, but 19c27 is I better alloy for the pro kitchen as it has the edge retention.

    But for a really sharp looker in Damascus, and also affordable, the SHiro Kamo R2 is a top contender.  This especially is not a beater knife though, R2/SG2 steel is great steel for taking a sharp edge and holding it, but is on the chippy side.

    The PM supersteels are another item that should get some consideration, but whatever here is available in Damascus will likely run you over $1K.

    But don't simply ignore non-Damascus blades.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2017
  6. foody518

    foody518

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  7. vic cardenas

    vic cardenas

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    Tanaka makes some pretty good damascus knives from what I hear. I always wanted to get one of these... 

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Tanaka-kitc...808751?hash=item3a97cba4af:g:URAAAOSw7NNUIXm0

    I have a Tanaka Kurouchi Nakiri that is one of my faves. Always wanted to try their damascus line. I don't mind thicker carbon steel knives but I guess their damascus knives are ground a bit thinner from what I've seen in pictures... That sounds pretty good to me. 
     
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  8. foody518

    foody518

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    Vic, how reactive do you find your KU Tanaka to be? 

    Knives and Stones sells the blue #2 damascus line with vastly upgraded handles and improved fit and finish
     
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  9. vic cardenas

    vic cardenas

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    Not too bad! Compared to Tojiro White Steel it seems to be fairly unfussy. It will still grow bits of yellow/brown if I neglect it. But for the most part it grows blue/purple/gray in a slow fashion. I scrubbed the KU down so it has a more of a mottled, what I would call, hybrid KU and (Pear Skin) Nashiji finish.... If that make sense... It looks really cool. Cheap but very good knife! 
     
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  10. martinz

    martinz

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    Real work horse will be Masamoto VG, good stainless, edge retension, profile.
    240mm ( 9.4 inch) is about 190$ at japanesechefsknife.com ( shipping included )70/30 edge, OOB sharppnes is not good, you would need to sharppen it prior using but it would be real step up from Wusthof
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2017
  11. tarak

    tarak

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    Hi. I'm only a very serious home cook - not a pro - but I'll give another recommendation for the Masamoto VG. I have their 210 Gyuto and I think its awesome. Nice all around knife. If you get it from Korin they will do an initial sharpening for free before shipping. I'm actually going to order the 240 within the next week. At $197, it fits in your budget nicely.

    What I enjoy about it is that it has nice weight (not heavy, not super light) and I think the profile flows on the board nicely. If you're used to German knives you're used to all that belly and the smooth flow- I think the Masamoto still flows nicely while giving you the sharpness and thin blade of a Japanese knife.

    Again, just a super serious home cook, but there's my thought.