Hello, how are u??cosigners?

Discussion in 'General Culinary School Discussions' started by gus20, Mar 14, 2005.

  1. gus20

    gus20

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    Culinary Student
    Hello How are u? I had question, but first i want to say hello to everybody. Im ending my studies here in Lima. I wanted to continue my studies in the Cia, in ny, but i need financial help. The CIA sent me webs for loans, it`s perfect i can get a loan, nut i need a cosigner who is american or resident or have a security card. BUt how do i get a cosigner from the USA? i cant understand that, cuz im not american, is there any wat to get a cosigner from the usa? Is there any other way to get a loan for studying in the USA?

    Thanks so much.

    Gustavo
     
  2. jim berman

    jim berman

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    Wow. Sounds like you are in a jam. Is there some type of embassy assistance? Have you asked the folks at the CIA what other students from outside of the US have done? Surely there must be other non-residents studying there. Keep us posted, Gustavo.
    Good luck.
     
  3. gus20

    gus20

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    Hello, how are u? Jim thanks for writing. Well i wrote to the CIA, thye tell me theres no way og financial help for international students, i should pay everything. Its a little difficult cuz its expensive. They says its very expensive even for northamericans cuz they help to the 85% of students with financial help. Well ill have to ask, wanna be my cosigner? hehe, cuz i donyt know northamerican people. Thanks to everybody. See u!

    kind regards, muchas gracias!

    Gustavo
     
  4. deltadoc

    deltadoc

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    Hola Gustavo,

    Mira hombre...you just graduated from Le Cordon Bleu cooking school. You really, in my opinion, don't need to go to the Culinary Institute of America at this point. If you can swing it, you should try to come to America, and find a job. Establish a credit history. That's how it works in America. You start working, once you have a job for awhile, then you can take out a loan or apply for a credit card. Once you have the loan or the credit card, you use it wisely. Don't go "hog wild" and charge up the entire credit limit. Because once you show that you have a stable work and credit history, then you can qualify for more credit. Loan people rely a lot on what's called your "credit score". This credit score depends on many different inputs, and Fair Isaac doesn't tell you or me what all goes into the mathematical formula that is used to calculate the "credit score". But mainly, work and wise use of credit are essential. Making payments on time is essential.

    Anyway, if I were you, that is what I'd do. It would be pretty much impossible to find an "American" who doesn't know you to be a co-signer. Because being a "co-signer" means that they are guaranteeing that if Gustavo doesn't pay back the loan, they will. Frankly, that's asking a lot from a complete stranger.

    Your situation is tough, but you do have your degree from LCB, so I would try to use that to find a job situation. You may have to take the risk of moving to America first in order to be here to apply for work. Life is full of risks, so you have to determine how much risk you are willing to take.

    That's the best advice I can give you.

    Good luck!

    Un abrazo,
    doc
     
  5. mikeb

    mikeb

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    In my opinion, in this business experience means more than education. Get yourself in some good restaurants, not only will you be making money, you can learn alot more on the job. I personally don't think any culinary 'degree' is worth as much as the CIA costs. Update your resume, start writing some letters and get a restaurant or hotel job...

    Edit - Don't you already have a LCB diploma? That should be enough to get into many high end restaurants, maybe do an apprenticeship in the U.S... Or even better, apprentice in a Michelin starred restaurant in europe - IMO thats worth more than any culinary diploma or degree...(I've worked with people who have done both routes btw...)