hello all

Discussion in 'New User Introductions' started by salvatore, Sep 22, 2004.

  1. salvatore

    salvatore

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    Hi
    Thought i'd introduce myself. I'm a 31 year old pastry chef living in Canada. Started down this path when i was 16, working part time in a bakery cleaning up trays. Well, that lasted less than a month. The baker upped and left and the owner of the place in question ploped my 16 year old self in front of a huge 13 tablet rotating oven. Through out that year, i lerned one thing...i heted making bread! But i also lerned another thing...i loved watching the pastry chef work! So for a while, after my 10 to 12 hour night of baking, i would stay and help out the Pastry Chef (without pay...but i loved it! ). After that i moved around alot, taking Pastry chef jobs wherever i thought i could lern something new. 6 to 7 days a week, as many hours as i could get. Then, at the age of 25, i decided to go to culinary school to get my Pastry Chef diploma (which, for me, was a wast of time).

    I'm glad i found these forums, which hopefully will give me an area to "talk Shop" (so to speak) with others in the field.
     
  2. lavender

    lavender

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    Salvatore, Welcome! I'm a newbie here myself. I'm interested in why you thought pastry school was a waste of time for you. Just becuse of your extensive work experience? I'm a young aspiring baker and trying to decide which route to go regarding culinary school....your advice would be great! I should probably post this somewhere else, but I'm not sure. Welcome again--I love it here!
     
  3. salvatore

    salvatore

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    Hey Lavender (and welcome right back at you)!

    I by no means ment that school is a wast of time for everyone, just for me. I was pretty much thrown into the biz without the "gradual" lerning process that makes for better education. The place i started in was rough, under-staffed and over-worked, and everyone there was old-school (i mean: we didnt just buy almont powder or almond past, we would take cases of almond, boil them, peel them, dry them, grind them). Such an enviroment forced me to lern fast. After all those years of working in the industry, most of the stuff lerned in school i already knew. Although i dont regret getting my "papers" from the course, the time i spend in school was mostly helping the teachers on their side projects.

    Also, i would totally scrap the way they teach here in Quebec (i dont know how they do it elsewhere). Here in Quebec, you go to school for 2 years (or 1 1/2), lerning theory and practice, followed by a month or so of stage ("internship" i think it's called in english). Most of my fellow classmate were bewildered and confused when entering the real work place, and may realized that the biz wasnt really for them. I think that it would be more beneficial to have theory and practice in school along side a "at work" apprentiship method (like they used to do in the old days). Of course, this is only my opinion. The peice of advice i give everyone going to culinary school is get a part time week-end job at a bakery/pastry shop/kitchen...regardless of the pay. The real world skills you lern will be greatly helpful and compliment what you lern in school.
     
  4. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Cook At Home
    Hi Salvatore! Somehow I missed your initial post. Welcome to the Cafe! Make yourself at home and enjoy all the forums.

    Mezzaluna
     
  5. salvatore

    salvatore

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    thanks, Mezzaluna

    It's a pretty nice place!
     
  6. lavender

    lavender

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    Thanks for your opinions. Welcome again and I'm sure I'll see ya round the boards! Thanks again. :chef: