Heavy cream shelf life?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by Joni Johnson, Oct 11, 2018.

  1. Joni Johnson

    Joni Johnson

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    I am working in a bakery as the head pastry chef. I a few of the bakers question the stability life of the heavy cream I use in mixes and say it needs to be thrown on the expiration date of the container. I know this it not true as I usually mix it to make mousse/pastry cream/mascarpone whip...is there any science or article in which I can present to them to make them understand the science of when cream truly expires?? I also say to taste it or smell it before but...they really don't understand and it would be really helpful if there was an article or evidence to base my knowledge off of...as I am new. And I guess I also don't really know the science (but know enough to know it definitely extends beyond the expiration date on the container; properly refrigerated) Any help would be appreciated!
     
  2. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    The date on the container is a sell by, not a use by, date. Heavy cream keeps several weeks longer than the indicated sell by date.
     
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  3. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    The waste of food caused by sell by and use by dates is currently a major topic of discussion at all levels and areas of food production and oversight in the US. The current estimate is that we (we as in food outlets of all kinds and the general public ie. everyone) throw out 40% of all food produced simply because an arbitrary sticker tells us to. There are many articles on the internet and in newspapers covering this topic.
    I'll offer a suggestion. Let a two quarts of heavy cream spoil, one opened and one unopened. Then you can show them by look, smell and taste what spoiled cream looks smells and tastes like and note how much farther it lasted than the label said it would. Too many employees are already in the habit of not thinking for themselves and relying on the stickers simply because that's how they grew up. A little actual guided experience can help. You might also point out the various uses for heavy cream after it's optimal life.
     
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  4. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    Fire them. Problem solved. If they have no idea what the shelf life of cream is, how the hell did they get a job working for you?

    Im kidding. Don't fire them. No, seriously....fire them.

    I'll just show myself out. :)
     
  5. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    This exactly. It's not as if the carton knows the date labeled on it and will magically go from perfectly usable to spoiled when the day changes. I'd be more concerned if you are having enough cream left over in a bakery that would warrant watching the expiration dates, which either means too much is being ordered, or the items/place is not doing enough business to justify the dessert items.
     
  6. iceman82

    iceman82

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    So as stated before, the label is a sell by date, and it is arbitrary at that - a date set by a governing body who really doesn't give a damn anyways. Yes, the product will usually last long after the sell by date. When the container is opened , it does begin a process and could change its shelf life. Also, anything that might be introduced to the container, such as a dirty spoon, or just leaving the carton open or the lid off for an extended amount of time could allow something to be introduced to it, rapidly speeding up the decomposition of the product.

    In my experience, when prepping something, I would always use fresh containers of whatever, and then just become very wary of it after five days. For the most part, NOTHING is good enough for my customers after four days for certain things and two days for the rest. It also depends on your clientele and the type of eatery you are at. You could freeze products made with cream ( or whatever products ) or extend the throw-away time being a little more lenient than I am.

    Anyways...... there ya go :)
     
  7. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    LOL, yeah :~)
    Luckily I am smarter than the container. A little hot coffee, pour in a splash of the cream. Incorporates, keep. Curdles, toss.
     
  8. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Curious what the bakers think about the sell by date on honey? Sour cream? Blue cheese? Knowledge is power. Blind belief in sell by dates can be hazardous on both sides of the equation. Spoiled products can be used and good products can be thrown away based on dates. We need to grow our knowledge rather rely on blind allegiance. We need to be smarter than our products.
     
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