Heating Oil

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Joined Dec 22, 2015
Virgin question -- be gentle. Wasn't able to find answer in database.

I've seen recipes that say heat pan and then add oil and recipes that say add oil to pan and heat both together. 

Does it matter? Do the different oil-heating strategies achieve different results? If so, why?

Thanks,

Stu
 
2,462
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Joined Mar 19, 2009
If its a thin carbon steel pan (or a traditional wok) it doesn't matter.

If its some sort of thick bottom pan like cast iron, aluminium, ceramic, stainless steel, etc. it matters because it acts as a heat buffer.
 
3
10
Joined Dec 22, 2015
 
If its a thin carbon steel pan (or a traditional wok) it doesn't matter.

If its some sort of thick bottom pan like cast iron, aluminium, ceramic, stainless steel, etc. it matters because it acts as a heat buffer.
Ordo:

Thanks for the quick response. I'm predominantly using all-clad copper core cookware -- a combination of aluminum and copper layers, with a stainless steel exterior (http://www.all-clad.com/Pages/Collections/COPPER CORE.aspx).

Stu 
 
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Joined Apr 25, 2014
If you heat the pan first and add the oil, you get some instant feedback about how hot the pan is.  Does the oil pool, does it spread around easy, does it smoke?  Then you can adjust your heat and or wait longer
 
4,699
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Joined Aug 21, 2004
 
If you heat the pan first and add the oil, you get some instant feedback about how hot the pan is.  Does the oil pool, does it spread around easy, does it smoke?  Then you can adjust your heat and or wait longer
If you heat the oil and the pan together you get feedback as the process unfolds. By watching the oil you can tell the precise moment that you need to act. That way, you don't have to adjust your heat or wait longer.

A side note; for anyone that has worked in a restaurant kitchen, one that I am sure they will recognize instantly, and that is the familiar beat up warped bottom aluminum saute/fry pans. The reason the bottom is warped is from being put on high heat, dry (no oil).

To any doubters, I have pans from my restaurant that were purchased new, used over 10 years, never put  on high heat dry. Tada!!!, they still have flat bottoms.

Flat bottomed pans you make the rocking world go round.(apologizes to Queen and Freddy Mercury)
 
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Joined Dec 23, 2000
You may be too young to remember the Frugal Gourmet's often-repeated mantra

"Cold oil, hot pan... food won't stick!"

No idea why that's so, but if the Froog said it it's bound to be true.

MIke   /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
 
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