Hazelnut Cake

186
10
Joined Nov 10, 2000
Looking for a Hazelnut Cake recipe. Anyone got a tried and true one?

:chef:
 
2,550
13
Joined Mar 13, 2001
Here's one from Johanne Killeen (Baking with Julia)

Makes 8 individual loaves—These small loaf cakes develop a thin, light, sugary crust, tender inner crumb due to the addition of cream to the batter. The loaves are beautifully flavored and scented with ground hazelnuts, and accompanied by a grappa-mascarpone cream. The cream is outstanding with these loaves.

The cream
3/4 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons sugar
3/4 cup mascarpone
1 teaspoon grappa

Whip the heavy cream with the sugar until it forms soft peaks. Scrape the mascarpone into a medium bowl and stir it briefly with a rubber spatula to loosen it. (Don't get carried away—the mascarpone is so rich that if you stir it too much, you'll have butter). Stir in the grappa, then fold in the whipped cream. Cover the cream and chill until needed. The cream can be made ahead and chilled up to 4 hours.

The cakes
1/3 cup hazelnuts, peeled
1 cup sugar
1 2/3 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt, preferably kosher or fine sea salt
1/2 teaspoon pure almond extract
1 cup crème fraîche (homemade or store bought), or heavy cream, at room temperature
1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 large eggs, at room temperature

Melted butter
Sliced peaches or other fresh fruit, for garnish

Position a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Brush a light coating of melted butter over the sides of 8 mini-loaf pans, each 4 1/4 by 2 1/2 by 2 inches. Dust the inside of each pan with a little flour and tap out the excess.

Place the hazelnuts and 1 tablespoon of the sugar in the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the metal blade. Process until the nuts are finely ground, taking care not to overdo this or you'll end up with hazelnut butter. Whisk or stir together the ground hazelnuts, flour, baking powder, and salt just to combine; set aside. In a separate bowl, add the almond extract to the crème fraîche and stir to blend and loosen the crème fraîche; reserve.

Put the butter and the remaining sugar in the bowl of a mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, or use a hand-held mixer, and beat on medium-high speed until the mixture is smooth and creamy, scraping down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed. The butter and sugar must be beaten until they are light, fluffly and pale, so don't rush it—the process can take 3 to 4 minutes with a heavy-duty mixer or 6 to 8 minutes with a hand-held mixer. Reduce the speed to medium and add the eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.

Working with a rubber spatula, carefully fold in the dry ingredients and the crème fraîche alternately—3 additions of dry ingredients, 2 of crème fraîche. You'll have a thick batter.

Baking the cakes—Divide the batter evenly among the prepared pans, filling the pans between half and two-thirds full, then give each pan a couple of taps against the countertop to settle the batter. Put the pans on a jelly-roll pan and bake for about 30 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in the center of a cake comes out clean. (Test a couple of the cakes to be certain). As soon as the cakes are removed from the oven, turn them out of their pans onto a rack. Invert the cakes and cool right side up.

The loaves can be served warm or at room temperature. Serve one loaf to a person, either slicing the loaves in half diagonally or cutting the into thin slices; garnish with the grappa-mascarpone cream and sliced fruit.

Storing—The cakes can be kept covered at room temperature for about 2 days or wrapped airtight and frozen for a month. Thaw, still wrapped at room temperature.

:lips:
 
186
10
Joined Nov 10, 2000
Wow Kimmie, That sounds awesome.
I need to make cake rounds. I'm sure it would be fine to alternate pans.
I'll try em.
Thanks.
Have a great Holiday!
 
2,550
13
Joined Mar 13, 2001
Sure Spoons. It may take a few minutes longer but you'll have to wing it. Your cue is when a toothpick inserted in the center of a cake comes out clean! :rolleyes:
 
222
10
Joined Nov 27, 2001
I use a recipe by Scott Clark Wooley. It is in Cakes by Design. It is one of my most popular. Unfortunately, I lent the book out and haven't gotten it back yet but maybe you could find it at the library. I also substitute the hazelnuts with pistachios and it is equally wonderful.
 
186
10
Joined Nov 10, 2000
Thanks Anna,
Was gonna try that one. But, it seems like it would be dense. Never tried his cakes. I actually do a hazelnut chiffon. I need something fuller,but not too dense. I'll give it a try. Thanks.
:roll:
 
222
10
Joined Nov 27, 2001
Roasted Hazelnut Cake
(from Cakes by Design)

Preheat oven to 300*.
Cream together until light:
1 c. butter
1 3/4 c. sugar
Beat in:
4 large egg yolks
Add:
1 c. roasted ground hazelnuts

In seperate bowl, mix together:
2 c. flour
2 tsp. b.p.
1/2 tsp. salt

Alternate adding dry indgredients and:
1 c. buttermilk

To the creamed sugar. End with dry ingredients. In separate bowl, beat stiffly:
4 egg whites
Fold into batter. Pour into prepared pans and bake till done.(approx. 1 hour for 10" pans). Remove from oven. Let cool 5-10 minutes, remove from pan and cover immeadiately in plastic wrap. Let cool with the plastic wrap on.

**yes, the 300* oven temp is correct- and yes, let cool wrapped in the plastic. These are not the 'normal' procedures but I promise a wonderfully moist, dense cake. Good for fondant and sculptured cakes in particular.
 
186
10
Joined Nov 10, 2000
Anna,
Tried the Scott Wooley's Hazelnut Cake last week.
It came out okay. Very buttery. Husband liked it. Interestingly, I did it his way. By, wrapping the warm cake. To keep it moist. I often wondered on the other board, that some of them always do that.
I always de-pan after 10 mins. or so.
What kind of flour did you use?
:)
 
2,938
11
Joined Mar 4, 2000
Whoa, thanks for bringing this thread back. I just realized that I never did post that recipe. I will definitely post it tomorrow.
 
2,938
11
Joined Mar 4, 2000
Here's the recipe I use, and I'm not sure of its origin, but I think it may be from the CIA:

13 oz. almond paste
1 lb. yolks
11 oz. sugar
4 oz. water
salt

1 lb. 8 oz. whites
13 oz. sugar

Process together:
2 lb. 4 oz. hazelnuts, finely ground
13 oz. bread flour

Cream alm. paste, sugar, water, salt. Slowly add yolks.

Make stiff meringue with whites and sugar. Fold into almond paste mixture simultaneously with hazelnut/flour mixture.

Greased pan with parchment.
 
186
10
Joined Nov 10, 2000
Thanks Momoreg,
It sounds heavenly.
I would like to use hazelnut flour as a substitution.
What would be the amount to use?
I really appreciate that you posted this recipe.
 
2,938
11
Joined Mar 4, 2000
Yes, Mezz., that would be the one:) .

Hazelnut flour will probably produce a drier product, but you can substitute it pound for pound for the hazelnuts. Maybe try omitting 2 oz. of flour. I once reduced the flour in this recipe by accident :eek: , and the results were still good.
 
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