Hard yolk mayonnaise

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My son likes the whites of hard cooked eggs but leaves the yolks.  I've made mayonnaise with the yolks but it always seems a bit thinner than with raw yolks and they don't seem to absorb as much oil, closer to 1/3 cup than 1/2 to 3/4 cup as usual.  It's also the only time mayo ever breaks on me.  Luckily, re-emulsifying it was no problem.  I'm making it by hand, whisk, no cold ingredients.

Is that just the nature of the beast with cooked yolk mayonnaise or is something wrong?  
 
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Not really, if you look at some older books like Escoffier and Larousse, there are several recipies for mayo and dressings using hard cooked yolks. Can't say as I've ever tried it though.
 
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This post makes me wonder if you're putting us on. Do you really wonder why hard cooked egg yolks don't emulsify as well as raw? 
No, I'm not in the habit of putting people on.

I know lecithin has poor stability over 100 C and that is probably the answer but since it's not really cited (as far as I can Google) and an egg is only boiled about 10 minutes and that a lot of the last internal cooking is likely residual from conduction, I figured I would ask for anyone's experience.  Isn't that what this site is for?  
 
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Yes, there was.  I was wondering if anyone else's experience was the same.  Theory is one thing, practice is another.  You've posted twice without actually offering anything.  Have you ever made mayo with cooked yolks?
 
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"This post makes me wonder if you're putting us on. Do you really wonder why hard cooked egg yolks don't emulsify as well as raw?" 

"Yes, that is what the site is for. But you also already knew the answer. There isn't really anything to wonder about."

So, let's see....you tell me you think I'm putting you on, you question the post in the first place, you incorrectly equate knowledge about emulsification with asking for other peoples experience, imply I shouldn't be asking in the first place, and then post 3 times without actually offering anything of your experience with the consistency of hard yolk mayo or it's tendency to break, then call me defensive.

Hmmm, hard to know where to go with that...... 
 
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kuan

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OK.  The mod says OK too.

Has anyone done this besides @chefwriter?
 
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It's the basis for sauce Gribiche, a French classic. Mustard is added to help the emulsion. 

You're right. Good catch. I already included mustard as in a standard mayo but gribiche probably seems thicker to taste because of all the chopped bits. Thanks.
 
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You're right. Good catch. I already included mustard as in a standard mayo but gribiche probably seems thicker to taste because of all the chopped bits. Thanks.
The classic mayo doesn't include mustard. When cooks first added mustard to mayo, it was originally called "Mayonnaise a la moutarde" (mustard mayo) to distinguish it from classic mayo. 

Another French classic based on cooked yolk mayo is Sauce Tartare. 
 
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Sorry, I used "standard", but did not mean to imply classic. Thanks again.
 
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I just made a variation of gribiche a few days ago actually. I used some reserved hard cooked egg yolks and some raw yolks to make a mayo, then folded in some chopped cornichons, shallots, herbs, capers, anchovy and the rest of the hard cooked eggs. It's really good. Malt vinegar (cause I like it) and some lemon juice and voila. 

Makes good foil for seafood or rich things. I've done it before (and planning to do it soon) with head cheese that has been breaded and fried, a la Thomas Keller. 
 
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Sauce Gribiche is in some ways more vigorous and robust than mayonnaise. Someday's use of pickled products and anchovies is exactly right: in a straight mayo, that would be overpowering, but in a Gribiche, it's spectacular. I want to hear how it worked with the head cheese!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
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I think it's one of those things where a change in perspective causes one to notice something.  Usually if I make gribiche, as I said, all the other bits give the sauce a pseudo-thicker texture, I think.  This time, we were having BLT's and I saw the yolks and thought to make a plain mayo.  Maybe I just never noticed it's not quite as thick as mayo with raw yolks.  Not spreadable but certainly delicious.  I had run out of lemons and used a 1/4 teaspoon of the liquid from a jar of preserved lemons I had made in the fridge.  It was the right amount of lemon juice and salt, luckily.

Yes, let us know how it worked with the head cheese.  Maybe it would be a nice change from mustard with other charcuterie.
 
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I have made Sauce Gribiche many times and it was not at all like mayo.  Could be the way I was making it.  This is a good discussion and I am learning.  Rpooly, why not separate the yokes from the whites before cooking?
 
 

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