Hard work, does it pay off?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by Frenchy_UK, Jun 13, 2018.

  1. Frenchy_UK

    Frenchy_UK

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    Hi people, new to the site and very new to FRESH food cooking. I have over 10 years experience in branded restaurants using mainly microwaves and combiovens with pre made ingredients and meals. I worked my way up to running my own kitchen, however now I am starting over in a fresh food enviroment as s commis.

    I am very new to it and I am worried I won't have the creativity and palette to combine different foods for different tastes etc. I know I can cook and get down with the best on the line. Speed isn't an issue and quality isn't, I will send out food to 100% of what it's ment to look and taste like as shown by the sous and head chef. However my question is can you be successful in the kitchen industry without being creative and creating your own dishes.

    Don't get me wrong I don't want to be a restaurant owner chef, I just want to be one of the hardworking guys behind the executive.
     
  2. someday

    someday

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    Yes, especially if you don't want to be an executive chef responsible for a menu. If you only work under other chefs, all you really have to do is replicate their vision for food the way they want it. Hard work never goes out of style. Congrats for taking on the challenge of working in a scratch kitchen.
     
    flipflopgirl likes this.
  3. redbeerd cantu

    redbeerd cantu

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    St. Philip's College Culinary Arts (AAS, Cum Laude), International Kitchens
    He's back...

    Ramsay Facepalm.png
     
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  4. someday

    someday

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  5. kronin323

    kronin323

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    15 yr Hospitality Professional (retired), current Home Cook
    In this context, please define "successful". What are your personal success criteria?
     
  6. chefross

    chefross

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    The title of this thread says it all. "Hard work, does it pay off?"
    That depends entirely on you.
     
  7. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Yes without a doubt. Being creative and creating you own dishes is actually only a small segment when compared to the entire spectrum of the kitchen industry. It just gets the most media coverage. Most jobs don't revolve around being creative. Very few actually.
     
  8. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Depends how you define creative, I guess.

    Not saying you need to garnish plates with streaked sauces and sprinkled with freeze dried powders, but creative enough to look in the fridge and come up with a respectable meal using whole chicken, asperagus, baby purple potatoes, and oyster mushrooms.

    Creative enough to continue normal kitchen operations when a vital piece of equipment breaks down, and creative enough to keep a bored, picky, whiney owner off your back...
     
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  9. 21TonyK

    21TonyK

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    As others have already said being successful as a chef is only in part to your culinary creativity and palette. The few who get to a level where this is their selling point have to work their way up to that point and that involves managing kitchens. And that has nothing to do with food. That is resource, people and financial management. Only once you can do that is your selling point your food.
     
  10. negan

    negan

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    Yes, but in my eyes the
    Hello, I want to say that working hard always pays off. But the time and the dedication that you pay to the work should be invested right.

    In my opinion the best thing to do is to find a good chef to learn from. I started since 5 years ago and have a collected experience of 2 years of work and 3 in school practice. And the last two months have been more rewarding than 5 years all together. Credits to my chef that has worked in Michelin starred restaurants and is passing me the knowledge.

    Point being my friend work smart not only hard. Learn to be the driver not the mule.


    Ps: I have to mention that I work ~90h a week.