Handmade pasta production?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by kuan, Jun 6, 2013.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    A couple questions.  How feasible is it to do 200 portions of handmade pasta per day to cover lunch and dinner service?  Say 20lb each capellini, fetuccinne, spaghetti, and ravioli?  Is there a hand roller that does it quickly?
     
  2. michaelga

    michaelga

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    KitchenAide stand mixer and pasta attachment is what we used at one place... it was on pretty much 24/7 and ran at least 16 hours a day making sheets that were hand cut on the line.

    tbh - a dedicated machine would have been better (as in faster production) but the boss simply wouldn't go for any 'uni-taskers' I think he was an Alton Brown fan, so it was the KitchenAid stand mixer and pasta attachment.
     
  3. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    So you're basically saying that it's doable but a pain, which is what I'm thinking too.
     
  4. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Sums it up pretty nicely.

    If you ditch the ravioli you could do it without too much pain.  Simply turn out squared off sheets of pasta, flour well, fold them and stack in the cooler.    The guy working pasta on the line then takes a folded bundle and cuts what he needs.

    If I remember right we did:

    - Linguine  (using a guitara kept by the pasta station), 

    - Fettuccine hand cut,

    - Lasagnette (or slicks) basically little oblong rectangles 1x3" hand cut,

    - Tagliatelle rigate (ran a ridged rolling pin over the sheet to create ridges and thin the dough out a bit then cut into ribbons by hand) I think this would actually be called Trenette?

    - Pappardelle hand cut,

    - Kids pasta, we took play dough cutters and cut out the sheets.  They were a square sheet with raised ridges in the shape of animals and vegetables.   Was actually pretty easy push down and lift off the 'negative' then bang on the side of the strainer.  Don't mess with individual shapes make sure you use the flat sheets with multiple shapes. (less waste and faster)

    So what's the plan anyway?
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2013
  5. cacioepepe

    cacioepepe

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