Growing Tomatoes in a limited space

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by mrdioon, Mar 4, 2005.

  1. mrdioon

    mrdioon

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    Hi All!

    I am looking for some information on a variety of tomato plants that will fit in a limited space. Im thinking about a plant that will grow "up" rather that "out". Any suggetions would be appreicated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. danbrown

    danbrown

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    Last summer I planted a hybrid "patio tomato" in a barrel planter. It grew pretty much srtraight up, and produced about 15 tomatoes. I had a very regular drip system watering it, and I think that was key as well. I'd recommend it, and I'm sure I'll plant another this spring.
     
  3. phoebe

    phoebe

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    What do you mean by "limited space"? Do you have a small section of garden? Or are you thinking of pots? Basically you can grow anything you want and train it to go where you want, though beefsteak-size tomatoes in pots are a little trickier. Think more about what you'd like: large or small, hybrids or heirlooms, red, yellow, purple, striped, etc.? I don't have a lot of garden space so I use 15 gal. containers along with those planted in beds. This year I'm growing 16 varieties all from seeds. Mostly heirloom, some hybrid, and all sizes and colors.
     
  4. mudbug

    mudbug

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    There are many methods by which to do this. If you have the means of transport, your best bet is to get a cattle panel. They're incredibly strong and average only $14. Otherwise, use galvanized steel rods from a local hardware supply (Lowes, Home Depot).

    For further information, search this forum:
    http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/tomato/
     
  5. sparrowgrass

    sparrowgrass

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    Mudbug, I use 2 cattle panels, set about a foot apart. Tomatoes are set 18-24 inches apart between the panels, and I don't have to tie them up--they take care of themselves.