Ground spice oils

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Joined Jul 31, 2000
If possible, in the next few days I will try and post the foundations in preparing spice oils,herb oils and fruit oils.

Today, i thought I would offer ground spice oils and their methods of preparation.

The Spices
All ground form
Mustard
paprika
Curry
Turmeric
Ginger
Caraway
Cardamon
Garlic
Cumin
Anise
Cinnamon
Wasabi
Fennel
Saffron (for Abby:p )

To make a spiced oil, first mix water with the ground spice before adding the oil. This rejuvenates or "wakes up" the flavor of the spice. With out this step the spice won't reach it's full potential.

Method;

Mix 3 tablespoons ground spice with 1 tablespoon water to a smooth paste. (If the paste is very dry add a little more water)
The paste should not be liquid, the consistency of ketchup is about right.

Put the paste in a CLEAN jar.
Add 2 cups of conola oil
Cover the jar and shake it like you never shaked it before ;)
Set the jar on a shelf somewhere in your house (I really don't care where) for 2 days.
You can shake it from time to time to increase the oils strenght.

The spice particles will graduall settle to the bottom of the jar. After two days remove the oil on top with a ladle (being careful not to disturb the solids on the bottom) Discard the solids, filter the oil through a paper coffee filter.

Keep the oil tightly covered. it can keep up to 6 months.

Have Fun
cc
 
4,508
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Joined Jul 31, 2000
Athenaues,

In this case yes.

You see, you want to use a neutral oil like conola because the olive oil has a very distint aroma and taste on it's own.

However for a garlic oil..YES
zuccinhi oil ....YES
bell pepper oil...YES
tomato oil..YES

I hope this makes sense.
cc
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
Maybe I wasn't clear.

The point is for the spice oils you want a oil that really is the vessel to carry the flavors of the oil.

The canola oil is not to play the leading role, but to be a supporting actor, so to speak.

The other recipes I posted above work wonderful with olive oil ~A~

again, I hope this helps
cc
 
750
10
Joined Apr 30, 2001
CC....I'm really sleepy this morning so maybe I wouldn't ask this if I were more awake...

You mean that each of those spices make a nice oil....not to use all of those spices to make one oil, right?

And if you were a total nutcase about not using canola oil...maybe extra light olive oil would do? It doesn't have much of an aroma or flavor????

I just got up, but I'm thinking about taking a nap.

Nanzzzzzzzzz
 
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Cape Chef, wouldn't another neutral oil such as grapeseed solve the problem for those who avoid canola because of gm's, etc.?
 
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Joined Jul 31, 2000
Nancy....YES

Alexa.....YES



Nancy, get to bed before 3:00AM :D


BTW Nancy,

Each spice makes it's own oil. I do love spice blends, but their is a limit:p
cc
 

pete

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I love to play with oils and vinegars. You can come up with some very cool flavorings with just a little ingenuity. Cape chef, do you ever slightly heat your oils to quicken the process. Not hot, just bring them up to warm (130 or so). I use this method to make ginger oil from fresh ginger root. Do you think that it would be better just to let sit for a few more days instead?

Nancya, are you just against using canola oil, or do you not use anything other than olive oil at all?
 
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I was ready to add this comment about heating the oil first.

But Cape Chef it's nice to have these small bottles but you have to be a serious cook, as you are, in order to know how to use them...

Otherwise , someone will do what I do! I toast bread and over a huge piece of feta cheese I sprinkle my oils.
I can eat a whole loaf testing oils...:cool:
 
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Dear Pete,

Actually, I don't heat the oil at all.

Especially with something like "fresh" ginger oil.

Because ginger is so pungent and moist, you can use the oil after only a couple hours.

Pete, this is also true for other rhizomes and some roots (like horseradish)

Give it a try, side by side..tell me what you think
cc
 
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~A~

I wasn't implying that someone should have a dozen different oils hanging around.

Also, because of the shear simplicity of the oils you don't need to be a series cook.

Just have some adventure and inspiration, and yes, a good loaf of bread and some feta.

If anyone at all would like a suggestion how to apply a particular oil to a dish, I would be more then happy to try and help.
cc
 
750
10
Joined Apr 30, 2001
Pete! I'm not actually opposed to canola oil...I just know this Mermaid that is a fanatic about it!

Thanks CC, I'm almost awake now!!! And I'd love some suggestions!

:)

Nancy
 
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Since you like scallops, I thought you may enjoy this one.

Sea scallops with garlic and tomato oil.

This recipe serves four.

10 cloves of garlic
6 T xvoo
1 1/2 pounds dry sea scallops
4 medium Idaho spuds
2 t sherry vinegar
1 t chopped chives
1/2 cup tomato oil (i'll post this recipe for you Nancy)
2 T clarified butter or xvoo

Blanch the garlic in boiling water for 15 seconds, drain and repeat 3 times, changing the water each time. puree in a small food processor or blender. Add 2 tablespoons of xvoo and blend until smooth


Cut a small pocket in each of the scallops and pipe in a little of the garlic puree. cover and pop in the fridge while you continue your prep


Peel the potatoes. Cook them whole in boiling water until tender when pierced with a fork (15/20 minutes

Drain and cut into 1/2 inch slices. Mix with the vinegar, chives and the rest of the xvoo.


If the scallops are wet, pat them dry. Melt the butter over medium-high heat and saute the scallops until golden brown on both sides. Serve with the potato salad and a drizzle of the tomato oil

Enjoy Nancy
cc:chef:
 
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4 large beefsteak tomatoes
1/4 cup xvoo
1 T chopped thyme

Put the tomatoes, unpeeled through a juice extractor. You should have about 3 cups of juice. In a sauce pan over medium high heat, reduce the tomato juice by 2/3rds to about 1 cup. Strain through a fine mesh strainer into a clean sauce pan. Reduce to a syrup, no more then 1/2 a cup. Stir in the Olive oil and thyme.Store tightly covered in the fridge

* Note

Nancy, If you don't have a juicer at home, just run the tomatoes through a processor or blender,and strain through a fine sieve making sure to push with a ladle to get as much exstraction as possible.

Then follow the recipe
cc
 
750
10
Joined Apr 30, 2001
Oh my heavens!

Thank you CC....these sound outstanding!

I have a tomato doohickey that separates seeds and skin from pulp and juice...this will do, yes?

...dances around thinking about the yummy scallops to come....


Nancy
 

phatch

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There is a risk when making oils from ginger, garlic and other moist aromatics. That risk is botulism. Oil is a no oxygen environment and this method won't sterilize itself. So only make oils from moist aromatics in small batches that you can use quickly.

Note that cape chef's examples all are from dry spices which are too dry to host botulism and so are safe in this method. Wise man, that cape chef.

Phil
 

pete

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Thanks for the insight CC. I will try them side by side to check out the difference.
 
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Don't know how I missed this - I love spice oils!

I do a toasted oil with my Mexican spices and dried chile powders; dry toast the spices/chiles first in a skillet, let them cool, then add the oil as CC says, and let it sit. It's a great flavor punch for Mexican food when you want a lot of flavor, and not a lot of heat.
 

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