Grinding brown rice for a flour?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by eastshores, Jun 5, 2010.

  1. eastshores

    eastshores

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    I was laying in bed the other night thinking about when I was eating healthy and exercising, and I recall that I basically ate brown rice with both lunch and dinner. I don't mind brown rice, but one challenge to eating healthy is to try and introduce some variety. I don't mean variety in the sense that a turkey sub varies from a roast beef sub, after enough subs you don't really care what kind of meat is on it.

    What I'm talking about is a core ingredient taking on a new persona. Something altogether different in texture and taste. So I thought that I should look into grinding the brown rice so that I could use it in other forms. In my mind I figured I would grind the rice to semi-fine, then combine with a little all purpose flour, then add a binder. For flavoring I was thinking maybe some toasted corriander seeds ground, or toasted cumin seeds, and fresh herbs like thyme, then to fry it in a little olive oil to make a fritter.

    Well before my experiment, I googled "rice flour fritter" and found this which looks good to me. I was wondering if anyone else has done something like this. Do you have any recommendations or advice? The link is apparently a puerto rican food, and the name almojabanas sounds way cooler than rice fritter! I'd like to use the fritter as a kind of base for various meats, roasted/grilled chicken, grilled pork chop, etc.
     
  2. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Does sound better than rice fritter. Haven't tried anything like it before.  Am thinking that perhaps (this is pure guesswork), as brown rice take longer to cook than white when whole - would it be crunchier or would it not make a difference?

    Has anyone else tried subbing brown for rice in this sort of thing, or even for coating fish etc....
     
  3. eastshores

    eastshores

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    I just ground the brown rice.. it's the first time I've ever ground a grain, and I must say my little coffee grinder that I bought for spice grinding laughed hysterically at the brown rice and turned it into a nice semi fine flour. It's about the consistency of cornmeal. I'll some pictures as I go along, can't do it just yet though, going to be playing my fiddle on stage in about 3 hours.
     
  4. vohrtex

    vohrtex

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    I would think you would need a grain mill, just for the volume. Also, a spice grinder doesn't seem to give a consistently sized product, if I remember right. I remember Alton Brown doing an episode where he tried out different grinders and looked at them under the microscope.

    As to brown rice cooking longer, that is due to heat and water penetrating the hull. but this is removed by grinding. Whole wheat flour cooks in the same time as white flour, you just need to adjust for leavening/gluten development.

    Have you tried it with regular rice flour? Readily available on the market, and could be a test run before trying brown rice flour.
     
  5. eastshores

    eastshores

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    I was grinding the hull on the brown rice to include the nutrients into the flour. My results were very good, I've read of others using different things, and some said their coffee grinder would heat up, mine certainly didn't. I'll try to get the fritter made tomorrow night, and will report back my results.
     
  6. fairykitchen

    fairykitchen

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    I am a gluten free baker and brown rice flour is integral to my flour blend. I have found that if I do small batches in the small grinder and then a few minutes in the blender give me very fine grind flour. Yes it is time consuming but much better on the budget.
     
  7. nirojan

    nirojan

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    Sir what percentage to mix the rice flour with corn meal?