Grinding Beef at Home

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10
Joined Jan 27, 2016
Hello, everyone.

I have read with great interest about grinders and I have decided to purchase a hand-crank style. ( I am so happy to have stumbled across this website.)

I have a couple questions/concerns that I hope someone can answer for me:

I have read conflicting info about the cutter plates/ grinding knives. Which is better- carbon steel or stainless? I don't mind keeping the carbon oiled- my Old Hickory knives are carbon and the are among the best I have- I love them! 

Also, why does no one offer a medium plate? I have searched and searched- even contacted LEM, but was told they did not offer a medium plate for the #10. It would seem to me the best grind for chuck would be to finish with a medium.

 I just want a small hand-crank type- it is just me at home (and my Boxer Henry) and just enough for a couple burgers or a batch of chili. 

Thanks for the time to reply to these questions!
 
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Joined Jan 21, 2016
Hello.

In my experience, different blades perform differently depending on what is being put through the grinder.  For instance, in my opinion, a good carbon blade that is properly sharpened works better for grinding something like pork butt.  It tends to handle the sinewy tissue and fat better than the stainless blade.  But, that is just my experience.  I don't have any hard facts that I can list categorically in support of my opinion. 

A stainless blade will tend to last longer than a carbon blade as well. 

Also, in my experience, either blade will work nicely for "softer meats" like chuck or sirloin, chicken, veal etc. 

Here is a link to a LEM's web page.  It appears the #10 medium grind plate is listed. 

http://www.lemproducts.com/product/12_grinder_plates_6mm/butcher-grinder-plates

I hope this helps.

Good luck!

-V
 
4,199
1,086
Joined Dec 18, 2010
For the Kichenaid, see Butcher and Packer Suuply (either their site or eBay) for good alternative to the stock Kitxhenaid plates and knife.
 
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5
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Joined Jan 27, 2016
Thanks to all for your input! Teamfat, I was basing my plate sizes on those provided by LEM in regard to their #10 model, which comes with coarse and fine plates. It just seemed to me medium would be ideal for chuck.But thanks to all for your links- I think I am on my way!
 
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Joined Nov 6, 2004
 
Thanks to all for your input! Teamfat, I was basing my plate sizes on those provided by LEM in regard to their #10 model, which comes with coarse and fine plates. It just seemed to me medium would be ideal for chuck.But thanks to all for your links- I think I am on my way!
   Hey Couture Cuisine,

    I got the #8 and will be buying my medium plate.  It's a nice grinder...but I'm still surprised it didn't have the medium supplied with it.  On the note of a Kitchen Aid...I like my machine but the best advice I have is not to use it for a grinder or a stuffer...it's simply not the right tool for the job.  On that note...a grinder with stuffing tubes isn't the right tool for the job...get a dedicated stuffer...even the small cheaper ones do a nice job.  When you're ready to upgrade from the small cheaper stuffer...buy some stainless steel tubes before you upgrade...it's like you have a new machine, though no upgrade in capacity.

   have a good day,

  Dan
 
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Joined Jul 13, 2012
I have a Kitchener grinder it came with three plates and grinds quite well.  It's compact and I think I paid $100 shipped for it.  For stuffing casings I have a LEM crank stuffer that works better than the grinder.  I wouldn't want to hand crank the amounts of stuff I grind when I do.
 
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Joined Sep 18, 2015
I have a Kitchenaid grinder attachment with two plates. It works great for grinding turkey sausage patties.
 

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