Grill temperatures

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by steve m bailey, Jan 9, 2011.

  1. steve m bailey

    steve m bailey

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    What temps are best for steaks, fish and chicken? I know some like to cook fish on high while others do better on a medium heat. Also I theink 350 to 400 is a good griil temperature but I wondered what others think. Some places sear the meat and finish in a salamander, some like a clamshell grill . I know I like gas or wood and don't care much for electric.
     
  2. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    OK, is it a
    • Grill (open grate), or
    • Grill plate (solid plate with raised ridges), or
    • Griddle (flat plate)
    And where are you measuring the temperature (and with what)?

    According to some, for steaks, the hotter the better. If I 'm not mistaken, Ruth's Chris among others likes something approaching 900°F+

    I like chicken hot to sear/char, then indirect to cook

    Fish, it depends on the type, cut, thickness, and what your goal is, IMHO.
     
  3. linny29

    linny29

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    Totally agree on these points PeteMcCracken, the type of grill makes tons of difference ... grill plates run hotter and should start at 400 degrees, open grate grills not only depend on temp but flame too (you want nice diamond marks but on some steak cuts a flame will just burn the outside) and flat grills are notorious for having multiple hot and cold spots .... which brings us to the 2nd part, how you measure the temp. If  you are just going by the knobs on the grill, i think of those more of a guide or reference point more than an real temp. The most accurate way (that I know of) to know what temp the cooking surface is a laser thermometer (kinda works like a speed gun that cops use ... point, shoot and instant results) most restaurants can not afford those and wind up with less accurate metal thermometers that sit on the grill to take the temp.

    As far as the different meats, in my experience steak, chicken and pork chops should start at a higher temp and get finished off at a lesser temp but the size, thickness, fat content, etc. are a factor in what temps those are but most I would start at 425 and finish at 350. Fish and ground meat should be cooked at a even temp from start to finish usually around 350.

    I personally have all three grills in my restaurant, all for different purposes, all at different temps, all with at least one lane at a higher temp for searing and I often finish off meats in the oven, just to bring them to the right temp.

    Crap, now I want a steak at 10pm! Hmmmm... maybe steak omelet for breakfast instead /img/vbsmilies/smilies/chef.gif
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2011
  4. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    IMHO, that is false economy, a laser IR thermometer  is less than $100, probably closer to $50 and has a multitude of uses far beyond grill/grate/griddle/pan temperatures, including monitoring walkin/refer temperatures.

    Take a look at Thermoworks and drool!