Grill station

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Joined Sep 28, 2014
Hey chefs,

Just looking for tips and tricks from grill station cooks. We have an 8oz filet and a dry aged bone in new York. I know taking temp and grill are all factors but any estimate for these kind of cuts or any tips. Usually 4 min a side for med rare?? 2 min then cross hatch, etc? Not sure just curious for a guideline.

Any other tips for having multiple orders and keep track. Any system you learned with your experience?

Do you guys keep a tag rolled up in a container with some oil to brush grill?

I appreciate the feedback and anything you have seemed that helps you for this station would definitely help someone who wants to learn and work this station. Thank you much
 
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Joined Jun 7, 2021
Do you have a flat top, flame grill, or broiler to work with. Even a heavy frying pa will give you great results. Your orders will come requesting the degree of doneness requested by the patron. For all of the cooking methods, until well experienced, check the meat temp in the thickest part of the meat. Try to have the meat sliced to an even thickness from the edge to the bone. Rare beef is at a temp 0of 125; F. .The meat will be red inside. Medium Rare - 135' with meat still red, but turning more pink, technically refereed to as warm red . Medium, - 145', and pink center. Medium Well - 150', a hint of pink in meat. Well Done - 160', No pink.

Grill marks are decorative. They really don't add to the meat flavor, and searing does not lock in juices. Do not salt until the neat is cooking, as salt will pull moisture from the meat. Contrary to what some believe, flipping a steak multiple times helps to insure that a steak is evenly cooked. Seasonings should be kept simple, i.e. salt, and pepper to allow the full steak flavor to stand out. After cooking, the steak should rest for 5 to ten minutes to let juices redistribute through the meat.
If serving on a sizzling hot platter, slightly undercook the steak, as it will continue cooking on the platter. If cooking in a pan, melt some butter into the pan as the steak nears doneness. Baste the steak with the hot butter. If cooking over fire, make a compound butter of butter, garlic, chives, and black pepper. Place the steak onto the serving late with a scoop of the compound butter on top.

If cooking multiple orders , say at a table of five, start the steaks that will take the longest to cook followed by the next longest cooking steak and continue to the steak that will cook fastest. The goal is to have then all done at approximately the same time.

Finally, don't get distracted. Steak will go from perfect, to overcooked, even burnt, in a very short time.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 
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Joined Jun 16, 2021
Hey chefs,

Just looking for tips and tricks from grill station cooks. We have an 8oz filet and a dry aged bone in new York. I know taking temp and grill are all factors but any estimate for these kind of cuts or any tips. Usually 4 min a side for med rare?? 2 min then cross hatch, etc? Not sure just curious for a guideline.

Any other tips for having multiple orders and keep track. Any system you learned with your experience?

Do you guys keep a tag rolled up in a container with some oil to brush grill?

I appreciate the feedback and anything you have seemed that helps you for this station would definitely help someone who wants to learn and work this station. Thank you much
Totally agree with the man from The North. Also, a key driver is the temperature of your meat. It's almost impossible to achieve a thin crust and homogeneous internal temperature if your meat is straight out of the fridge. Set yourself a process where a batch always has time to get close to room temperature before going on the grill.
 
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Joined May 5, 2010
If you are a grill cook, I would think that you would know all of this before you were placed in the position. Just sayin no?
People will throw you all kinds of advice. None of it means anything unless you are on the grill doing the actual cooking,
I was the broilerman for a busy golf course dining room. My broiler would have 20 steaks going at one time. The MR's go here, the WD's go there, blue cheese goes on this one, better butterfly that one.
If you don't organize yourself, you can easily lose thought and control.
One more piece of advice. "You control the fire not the other way around."
Yes grill marks are decorative but they do serve a purpose.
On the seasoning. I've written extensively about the subject.
Season right before cooking or up to 2 1/2 hours before cooking. Salt does draw out moisture but allowing the meat to sit for that amount of time allows the moisture and salt to be re-absorbed into the meat, making the steak more moist. Seasoning with salt just before cooking doesn't allow the moisture to be released.
 
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Joined Jun 7, 2021
If you are a grill cook, I would think that you would know all of this before you were placed in the position. Just sayin no?
People will throw you all kinds of advice. None of it means anything unless you are on the grill doing the actual cooking,
I was the broilerman for a busy golf course dining room. My broiler would have 20 steaks going at one time. The MR's go here, the WD's go there, blue cheese goes on this one, better butterfly that one.
If you don't organize yourself, you can easily lose thought and control.
One more piece of advice. "You control the fire not the other way around."
Yes grill marks are decorative but they do serve a purpose.
On the seasoning. I've written extensively about the subject.
Season right before cooking or up to 2 1/2 hours before cooking. Salt does draw out moisture but allowing the meat to sit for that amount of time allows the moisture and salt to be re-absorbed into the meat, making the steak more moist. Seasoning with salt just before cooking doesn't allow the moisture to be released.
Well said Chef Ross. What you said about salting is something I should have included in my post,. Also, I should have put that with acidic marinades, ten minutes is as good as ten hours, as the proteins react with the acid, and create a barrier to any of the marinade penetratingly deep into the meat. Brines, on the other hand, require time to be drawn all through the meat.

As far as cooking a station goes, though my experience is not as extensive as yours, I cooked with a man for over 200 people at a summer camp. We cooked all foods from scratch, steaks, chicken, Hispanic, Asian, salads, veggies, deserts, etc. I've also catered multiple events for 200 or more for wedding receptions. My go to cooking method for those events was a large charcoal grill stove top, and oven. One of the receptions was desert themed, which had me making fresh pastries, cookies, cake, pikes, etc. for three days in preparation. My smoked turkeys were also requested for wedding receptions. The point of this is that though I haven't cooked professionally, I have cooked with professionals, and did the same job as professional cooks but without pay;

Chief Longwind of the North.
 
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
Also, I should have put that with acidic marinades, ten minutes is as good as ten hours, as the proteins react with the acid, and create a barrier to any of the marinade penetratingly deep into the meat.

Sorry I have to disagree with this. I do a family bulgogi about once a week and there is a noticeable difference in flavor and texture depending on how long the meat will sit in the marinade.

Contrary to what some believe, flipping a steak multiple times helps to insure that a steak is evenly cooked.

This may be true, not sure, but from my experience on a busy broiler/grill station cross hatching and flipping once is the easiest way to go in terms of being able to stay organized and not lose track of which steaks have been cooking for how long and where, etcetera.

As far as the OP's question, you just need a system for where you are resting your meats based on temps and a FIFO attitude. If you need help determining proper temps while cooking, you may want some more experience before jumping on the grill/broiler station as continued wrong temps during a busy meal service will quickly sink the service.
 
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Joined Oct 2, 2016
On the grill: my first line is blue, my second is rare, my third medium and the last well done.
I charge left and flip the steaks to the right.
I slip the order form in parallel with the grills.
As I approach the right, my second sets up the plates with the garnishes as needed
 
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Joined Sep 28, 2014
Thanks for your reply. I like that idea. Keeping lines for certain temps. Totally makes sense. So for your cross hatch, do you face them to the left on diagonal, then face to the right on the diagonal? Flip and face to the left again and then to the right?
I've seen people do this way, or some people lay across the grill running perpendicular then rotate 45degress so to get the cross hatch. Just curious of there is a system that works for you so you know which flip each steak is at. I appreciate that very much. Helps alot.
Also, do you always keep like a rag rolled up to constantly oil the grill?

This a new restaurant and I just wanted some knowledge before hands from the veterans out there. I'm sure when they hire a broiler cook I can learn but figured more input the better.

Any experience with 8oz filets? Depending on grill temp and if it's tempered, just curious for a ball park estimate I should be looking for. Maybe 6 min each side? 3 min, cross sear 3 min, the ln flip and repeat?

Thanks again Thomas for the info
On the grill: my first line is blue, my second is rare, my third medium and the last well done.
I charge left and flip the steaks to the right.
I slip the order form in parallel with the grills.
As I approach the right, my second sets up the plates with the garnishes as need
 
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Joined Dec 18, 2010
Is there any reason why you can’t try cooking an 8 Oz filet and either cut it open or stick a thermometer in it?
 
4,755
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Joined Aug 21, 2004
When I put steaks on a grill, I think in terms of the hands on a clock. The initial contact/orientation is towards 11:00. The first flip is still towards 11:00. The next flip is towards 1:00. The final flip is towards 1:00. This method works in my head for helping me keeping track of different steaks and where they are in cooking process by the visual clues of the grill mark progression and IMO makes for a better distribution of meat juices.

As to ball park time estimate for an 8oz filet, I haven't got a clue as I have never timed the cooking of steaks. I will offer this experience though on cooking filets, when I feel/temp filets, I do it on the side rather than on the top because the tension/resistence felt gives my brain a more relatable answer. To me the top always feels soft/ spongy/underdone and so lends itself to tricking my brain into overcooking the meat.
 
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Joined Sep 28, 2014
I will when we start cooking. We are few weeks out. I know experienced cooks do it by feel and I'll temp and feel as I'm going to learn. Like i stated before, just looking for an experienced broiler cooks input. They've worked that station for years. So I'm sure they know 8oz filet takes roughly this long. Like I said just looking for any advice from more experienced people. Thanks
 
27
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Joined Sep 28, 2014
When I put steaks on a grill, I think in terms of the hands on a clock. The initial contact/orientation is towards 11:00. The first flip is still towards 11:00. The next flip is towards 1:00. The final flip is towards 1:00. This method works in my head for helping me keeping track of different steaks and where they are in cooking process by the visual clues of the grill mark progression and IMO makes for a better distribution of meat juices.

As to ball park time estimate for an 8oz filet, I haven't got a clue as I have never timed the cooking of steaks. I will offer this experience though on cooking filets, when I feel/temp filets, I do it on the side rather than on the top because the tension/resistence felt gives my brain a more relatable answer. To me the top always feels soft/ spongy/underdone and so lends itself to tricking my brain into overcooking the meat.
Thank you. I never thought about feeling the sides. Good advice? So you prefer doing one set of lines then flipping the steak on the other side and marking one set, flipping back on side to cross hatch, then flip again? Or so you cross hatch one side and flip just once? Thanks for your time
 
4,755
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Joined Aug 21, 2004
Or so you cross hatch one side and flip just once?
No I do not do this. I flip three times with cross hatch happening on second flip (cross hatching also naturally happens on 3rd flip as well). Hopes this makes sense, easier to show than it is to explain.
 
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Joined Sep 28, 2014
No I do not do this. I flip three times with cross hatch happening on second flip (cross hatching also naturally happens on 3rd flip as well). Hopes this makes sense, easier to show than it is to explain.
Heard. I know exactly what you mean. 3 flips total. Thank you!!
 
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