GREEN GANACHE? FOR APPLE MOUSSE DOMES

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Joined Feb 28, 2013
Hi all - It's ages (like years) since I was last on here, but I am back to cooking on barges and have become obsessed with dome moulds. I am going to try apple mousse and want to make a green ganache type shiny covering after I have turned them out of the mould. I have no idea where to start. Any idea, suggestions would be great. I see a few photos on the internet, but no recipes or suggestions as to how to do it. Thanks!
 
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Welcome back. I'd like to hear more about what cooking on barges is like.
To answer your question. A mold would be typically lined with the outside layer first, then filled, so when turned out of the mold, the exterior is already finished. Perhaps the professional baking and pastry types will offer more info on how this would work with ganache and mousse.
Do you have a recipe in mind? While the apple mousse seems straightforward, I thought ganache was based on chocolate so I'm curious how you would make it green. A green marzipan layer on the outside might be nice. I don't know how to make it shiny. You could lay in the rolled marzipan, then a layer of chocolate, then the mousse. You would have a tri-colored mold when cut in to.
 
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I have no idea how you would do this but I'm thinking white chocolate and mint. Not sure if that would pair well with apple though.
 
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I went searching as well.
Will you freeze then unmold for the glaze and park in the fridge?

OBTW...nice to "see" you.
mimi
 
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Thanks for all the comments flipflopgirl, koukouvagia and chefwriter. I currently make a chocolate dome which is choc mousse that I fill the mould with, freeze, turn out of the mould and then cover with a choc ganache. I thought the same idea would work with an apple mousse. Since posting this, I have seen something called a mirror glaze which contains gelatine, water, sugar and food colouring - which I am not too keen, but may not have any option. I plan to experiment soon! Watch this space. :)
 
110
19
Joined Feb 28, 2013
Welcome back. I'd like to hear more about what cooking on barges is like.
To answer your question. A mold would be typically lined with the outside layer first, then filled, so when turned out of the mold, the exterior is already finished. Perhaps the professional baking and pastry types will offer more info on how this would work with ganache and mousse.
Do you have a recipe in mind? While the apple mousse seems straightforward, I thought ganache was based on chocolate so I'm curious how you would make it green. A green marzipan layer on the outside might be nice. I don't know how to make it shiny. You could lay in the rolled marzipan, then a layer of chocolate, then the mousse. You would have a tri-colored mold when cut in to.
Working on barges is great - if a bit challenging until you get used to the small spaces! I am in France and work on barges on the Burgundy canal so get to see beautiful scenery when I look out the window! :)
 

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I think a white chocolate with green food coloring or something natural (mint was mentioned above) would be your best bet. Mirror glazes are fine but not really what you are looking for. You might be able to tailor a mirror glaze to match the apple mousse flavors though.
 
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I think a white chocolate with green food coloring or something natural (mint was mentioned above) would be your best bet. Mirror glazes are fine but not really what you are looking for. You might be able to tailor a mirror glaze to match the apple mousse flavors though.
Thanks someday. I'm going to experiment nrxt week.
 
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I thought on this for a few days walking the different formulas thru my head.
The gelatin in the mirror glaze may develop a rubbery texture when exposed to the still frozen mousse...
I say may because I am not much of a gelatin person (disaster seems to strike most of the time :oops:).
foodpump foodpump works/worked with that glaze ( if I remember correctly...) maybe he can chime in.
As for the white chocolate....I am pretty sure this can be done , no problems.
You may have to stretch and twist a recipe that will get firm but not TOO hard or it may shatter robbing the diners of a the intended mouthfeel experience of the fluffy lite and silky textures.
If you want to color the white chocolate be careful to use the products meant for candy work.
Not knowing if you knew the last tip or not but just tossed it in to remind anyone who might want to try at home.
:)

Luck...
mimi
 
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Most glazes I use are something like this:

100% whipping cream
80% chocolate
20% corn syrup or glucose

Just boil the cream, stir in the chocolate and corn syrup and your done. The corn syrup is for flexibility, if you don't use it, the glaze will crack within a day. You might have to experiment with ratios, as fat contents of the cream and chocolate can vary.

I like to glaze with the item sitting on a piece of cling film, glaze genorously, lift the item off, gather up the cling film and wring it out back into your container of glaze.

You can make your own green colouring with spinach: Puree fresh spinach with water, pour an insert and sit this in a steam table or water bath. The chlorophyl will separate and clump together,
 
110
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Joined Feb 28, 2013
I thought on this for a few days walking the different formulas thru my head.
The gelatin in the mirror glaze may develop a rubbery texture when exposed to the still frozen mousse...
I say may because I am not much of a gelatin person (disaster seems to strike most of the time :oops:).
foodpump foodpump works/worked with that glaze ( if I remember correctly...) maybe he can chime in.
As for the white chocolate....I am pretty sure this can be done , no problems.
You may have to stretch and twist a recipe that will get firm but not TOO hard or it may shatter robbing the diners of a the intended mouthfeel experience of the fluffy lite and silky textures.
If you want to color the white chocolate be careful to use the products meant for candy work.
Not knowing if you knew the last tip or not but just tossed it in to remind anyone who might want to try at home.
:)

Luck...
mimi
Thanks mimi - some great tips here. The mousse is defrosted before I coat with ganache or glaze. Thanks for your input though - I'm not a fan of gelatin either, but am going to give a mirror glaze a try!
 
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Joined Feb 28, 2013
Most glazes I use are something like this:

100% whipping cream
80% chocolate
20% corn syrup or glucose

Just boil the cream, stir in the chocolate and corn syrup and your done. The corn syrup is for flexibility, if you don't use it, the glaze will crack within a day. You might have to experiment with ratios, as fat contents of the cream and chocolate can vary.

I like to glaze with the item sitting on a piece of cling film, glaze genorously, lift the item off, gather up the cling film and wring it out back into your container of glaze.

You can make your own green colouring with spinach: Puree fresh spinach with water, pour an insert and sit this in a steam table or water bath. The chlorophyl will separate and clump together,
Thanks foodpump - that's exactly the recipe I have for my choc ganache. Your spinach idea is so interesting! Thanks.
 
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So - here is the result. I made a white chocolate ganache and added food colouring - it isn't mind blowing, but the mousse is delicious, and the small domes will work well with an apple themed dessert. White chocolate doesn't seem to make as silky a ganache as dark chocolate?
 

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Looks good. You might try running a torch over the white chocolate very briefly right before serving to make it shiny...I think. I actually don't know if that would work with white chocolate but might be worth a shot.

What is the rest of the dessert going to be?
 
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Joined Feb 28, 2013
Looks good. You might try running a torch over the white chocolate very briefly right before serving to make it shiny...I think. I actually don't know if that would work with white chocolate but might be worth a shot.

What is the rest of the dessert going to be?
Thanks someday - that's an interesting idea about running a torch over the choc - will give it a try. I haven't decided what the main dessert will be - we try and keep a french theme to our meals - so something like a french apple trart - or tarte tatin and then these little domes to zshooz the plate up a bit! I have 4 weeks work starting early September, so have a bit of time to work on my menus. :)
 
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When I saw the pictures, I was thinking of the dome being the star of the plate. I like the round shape of dome mirroring round shape of the plate. If so, perhaps slightly larger. If it won't be used that way, perhaps a rectangular shaped plate. So a quenelle of something to one side with bits of something else to round out the presentation and a biscuit/cookie/tuile to finish it off.
Or the dome could sit center of plate on top of a slightly larger round of cake or cookie or sauce of a contrasting color with fans of apple slices and bits of broken nougat or something contrasting in flavor and texture.
 
110
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Joined Feb 28, 2013
When I saw the pictures, I was thinking of the dome being the star of the plate. I like the round shape of dome mirroring round shape of the plate. If so, perhaps slightly larger. If it won't be used that way, perhaps a rectangular shaped plate. So a quenelle of something to one side with bits of something else to round out the presentation and a biscuit/cookie/tuile to finish it off.
Or the dome could sit center of plate on top of a slightly larger round of cake or cookie or sauce of a contrasting color with fans of apple slices and bits of broken nougat or something contrasting in flavor and texture.

The plate was one I have at home - the barges all have different shapes and sizes of plates - so I would need to see what is there when I get there! I like the idea of a small dome sitting on a bigger round of perhaps apple tart and then other textures as you say around it. Thanks!! that's given me a lot to think about.
 
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I like how those came out. I may be writing this down for future ideas... :)

If they were cut unto wedges (maybe quartered) and then given "pips" (chocolate?) they would look like slices of green apples. That would be nice on top of your tart.
 
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Joined Feb 28, 2013
I like how those came out. I may be writing this down for future ideas... :)

If they were cut unto wedges (maybe quartered) and then given "pips" (chocolate?) they would look like slices of green apples. That would be nice on top of your tart.

I love this idea! Thanks fatcook.
 

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