Great Classics - Are They Dead?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by capecodder, May 13, 2006.

  1. capecodder

    capecodder

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    For shame on our professional chefs here. In the thread,"Advice, please- about filet mignon, Bearnaise sauce, and other flavors!", the perosn said he had a whole tenderloin and wanted a luxurious dinner.

    Not one single responder mentioned Beef Wellington, the classic filet mignon dish!

    As an avid eater :)-) and a pretty **** good home cook, I am mystified at the loss of such timeless and wonderful classic dishes. In my darkest thoughts I wonder if the complexity and care required for thse dishes is beyond the modern professional chef. Beef Wellington is a pretty tricky dish. Keeping the puff pastry from being a gooey steamed mess from the humidity given off by the perfectly roasted fllet and pate requires thought and skill.

    Certainly such a dish requires more skill than creating foam in a whipped cream dispenser - one of the more ludicrous moderne touches.

    Then there's the "famed" tv cook whose fame seems to be based on good grilling techniques and mixing three miscellaneous ingredients to make still another ubiquitous SALSA. Eeek.

    Honest, guys (and girls) my palate has been surprised enough. Hot mixed with cold , spicy mixed with sweet, yada, yada. Is disgusting mixed with delicious next? What a surprise to our palate would be a forkful of something great mixed with disgusting. ****, that's worthy of a book.

    Look I am not asking for a return to the old, haute cuisine days. Just, if someone says "whole filet" and "luxurious," please, please have Beef Wellington cross your minds.
     
  2. chrose

    chrose

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    CC, take a deep breath, sit down have a "classic" cocktail, like a Manhatten and relax.
    Nobody has thrown away classic cuisine. MikeLM said they were GRILLING the filet. I studied classic french cooking, and I don't recall much use of a gas grill. I suppose you could, but we'll save the Beef Wellington for a more formal sit down meal. Have no fear, we still appreciate the classics.:beer:
     
  3. cape chef

    cape chef

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    You don't make classic wellington with filet Mignon, you use the whole tenderloin. First people have to get there subprimals down before they jump.

    Chrose, please reserve the handle C.C.:cool: :mad:
     
  4. diane

    diane

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    I am wishing there is a resurgence of the wonderful foods of old. Perhaps one of the problems is not the Chef, but the expertise of the staff serving. I have had, once in my life, Crepes Suzette prepared and served table side. It was prepared and presented with a skill seldom seen in any restaurant. It wasn't very long after the war, and we were getting Dutch, German, continental waiters in general. They were supurb. An extra dish to see them working. Really it was far more entertainment than anything. I suspect it was that generation of foreigners who kicked our gvt fair square in the pants, and into the 20th century. I also think quite a number of them were chefs.
     
  5. chrose

    chrose

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    I humbly apologize:blush: That thought crossed my mind when I posted that, yes I will reserve that handle CC
     
  6. crazytatt

    crazytatt

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    Classics are by no mean dead, just grilling+fillet=Not wellington.

    We still have Lobster thermador,Seafood Newburg, Waldorf salad, and the like still involved in our daily banquet routine. I DO however alwys push for a more updated menu when I meet with our clients. But "Classics" will never die, that's why they're "Classics".
     
  7. cape chef

    cape chef

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    xoxoxoxoxo :eek: :p All in good fun Chrose!!
     
  8. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Chrose, empty your P.M. box you popular guy you.
     
  9. someday

    someday

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    Lol...owned.
     
  10. chrose

    chrose

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    Done......still had some room I thought.
     
  11. capecodder

    capecodder

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    Hey Cape Chef, I started off by saying "the person said he had a whole tenderloin" the got into trouble with mignon. lol

    Where I really went haywire was missing the fact that he was going to grill the beef. In the words of the late great, Emily Litella, "Never mind."

    Are you asking me not to use Cape Codder as my name? I will accede to you, but I have been on this forum since August 2001 and it's not bothered you before. We have even had some discusiions re soft-shell clam preparation, etc.

    Let me know. <waving white flaqg of truce> I do so love this forum.
     
  12. chrose

    chrose

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    Cape, I don't think Brad is referring to your "stage name", I believe it was more of me calling you "CC" which has always been Cape Chefs sort of "nickname". I could be wrong, but I don't think so. Besides, it is all in good humor, so I think you're alright.:D

    PS. Great Emily Litella reference! [​IMG]
     
  13. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Classic loved combos....veal oscar...veal/asparagus/crab
    beef wellington...puff/pate or shrooms/filet
    Daube...french beef stew
    Nicoise...tuna composed salad

    So what are your faves? I can't remember the last time I had Veal Oscar.

    There is only one CC.
     
  14. suzanne

    suzanne

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    The "classics" are by no means dead -- you just have to know where to look for them. There are several restaurants here in NYC that still do things like Beef Wellington (although in individual portions) -- One if by Land, Two if by Sea is one, and gets consistently high Zagat ratings. But the ranks of classic French restaurants are shrinking, yes.

    As for doing the classics at home -- there are classics, and there are classics, if you know what I mean. Restaurant classics are better left to restaurants, imo, where there is the staff, equipment, and ingredients to make all the necessary elements. But serious home cooks (like some of the folks here) will never give up on coq au vin, or boeuf à la bourguignonne, or confit de canard, or cassoulet, because as complicated as these can be, they are the classics of the home. And some of us will never give up the search for THE classic roast chicken. :lips:
     
  15. cape chef

    cape chef

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    CapeCodder, Chrose is 100% on target,No problem.No flag necessary
     
  16. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    THE MAN IS CORRECT THE CLASSICAL WELLINGTON IS A LARDED WHOLE TENDERLOIN ( DOES ANYONE REMEMBER A LARDING NEEDLE)WHICH PATE AND A DUXELLE ARE PUT AROUND THE BEEF. THIS ALSO ASIDE FROM FLAVOR ,HELPS INSULATE THE BEEF FROM OVERCOOKING WHILE THE PUFF PASTRY BROWNS. IT IS NOT SERVED WITH A BERNAISE BUT NORMALY A SAUCE PERGUIDINE WHICH IS BLACK TRUFFLE AND SHALLOT BASED. UNFORTUNATLY REAL HAUTE HAS ALL BUT DISAPPEARED DUE TO THE HIGH COST OF LABOR AND PRODUCT. IN MY DAY EVERYTHING WAS SCRATCH AND IT IS STILL THE BEST ED BUCHANAN