gooey cinnamon rolls

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Joined Nov 26, 2000
I need a good recipe for some really gooey cinnamon rolls. Mine are OK, but not as good as the old lady where I work. She is retiring next month and wont share the recipe.

The difference is definately in the dough.

I have been watching her and it seems she has a higher fat to sugar ratio. Also she uses shortening as her only fat..no butter.

Any help would be appreciated. One month and counting til the members go nuts because the rolls have changed!! :eek:

eeyore
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
For great sweet rolls use the brioche dough from Baking with Julia. You can make it in huge batches then seperate into portions and freeze. Then take out and defrost in your cooler over night what you'll need for the next day.

*For cinnamon rolls I think the trick is using brown sugar with your cinnamon instead of white. I discovered this at Pastry Chef Central's recipe site. They have a cin. roll recipe that's great fresh! But it doesn't hold at all, so I go with Julia's dough. They also have a great frosting for your cin. rolls. It uses cream cheese and tastes alot like Cinnabons!


I can't remember the exact details but there was something about Julia's recipes for carmel rolls using her brioche that I didn't like so steer clear of using her exact recipe for sweet rolls and only use her dough.

I also like to use a potato dough for sweet rolls. I'll make it the night before, proof and even shape them, then let them proof over night in the cooler. Take out the next morning bring them up to room temp. and bake.
 
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P.S. If you use Julia's brioche you'll blow away the older (selfish) womens sweet rolls, I promise! Remember to keep a light hand with your dough and a heavy hand with your cin. sugar. ;)
 
7,375
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Joined Aug 11, 2000
Raisins soaked in Makers Mark,fresh orange zest and brownsugar/cinnamon....Brioche dough
use the soaking liquid and alittle fresh OJ to make your powdered sugar glaze...oh my gosh...these things are FINE
I like pecans in mine

I can't believe that the CC would not want to have her recipe....ask if they would buy it from her....
 
379
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Are you referring to Nancy Silverton's brioche dough featured in Baking with Julia?

If so, your right, Wendy, this dough is exquisite.

Eeyore, also try to look up Nancy's pastry book:

Pastries from La Brea Bakery

You will find interesting excerpts and recipes at

www.amazon.com

You won't see her using shortening in her doughs. Just butter. The very best butter you can find. It's all about ingredients and technique.

Good luck!

:p

[ April 30, 2001: Message edited by: pooh ]
 
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
Yes pooh, from Baking With Julia. I didn't realize it was from Nancy Silverman. I bought her book ....La Brea Bakery. Funny thing is nothing jumps out at me, calling me to make it. It must be a visual thing...the look of the books type and photos don't excite me. Are you making anything out of it?

I also went to your post at Martha's site. I tend to think croissant dough and danish doughs aren't appropriate for sweet rolls. They are too flakey and not what I seek in a sweet roll.

But I also highly recommend the danish dough recipe in Baking With Julia also. I can't spell here name Judith O. but I've made several other breakfast pastries from her that are all fabulous! Her cusinart method for danish is brilliant! I make several batches at once and freeze them. So it's very convenient for those last minute parties. :D
 
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Ah, I do Nancy's Olive Bread, Rustic Bread. The raisin bread is probably the best I've tried so far. I've done a few more, can't remember the name of all (i'm not home)!

I followed her method for sourdough starter made with grapes. Works for me. It's been alive for several years and getting better and better. Once you've been through that hurdle, you can make just about everything in the book.

Ever been on her website
www.labreabakery.com

and yes, about Judith O. :confused: , she's Norwegian or Sweedish. She's also brilliant with the microwave for her fillings! I've never frozen her dough. How long do you keep it in the freezer?

:rolleyes:
 
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Wendy and Pooh:

It's Beatrice Ojakangas and she is 100 percent Finnish heritage!

I agree, her danish dough is the very best!

;)
 
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
YES, Beatrice OJAKANGUS!!!!!! If I could remotely sound her name out in my head I might one day remember her last name! But I do think she's great!

I have one cookbook and one article she published on danish (years ago, I don't remember where I got it from) and little else from her. Rarely I'll see a small reference to her like in Julia's book. She's kind of like Abbie Mandel...where'd they go?? Their both terrrrrific and I can't find enough of their work!

P.S. I think there's a note in Julia's book on freezing the danish dough...1 month, but I've gone longer with-out side effects.

I also have started working differently with my danish...I shape and fill them, then put them in the cooler for the day to slowly rise(no warm proofing). I bring to room temp. then put in the oven 375 and they bake perfectly. My air temp. varied too much and my work area was too far away from where I proofed that occasionally I'd over heat and have butter melt out. I do love fool-proof short cuts! :D
 
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
TX for the tip Wendy on working with danish dough. Would it be better to avoid doing that during summer months?
 
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
HUM? Would it be better avoiding using the cooler to rise danish in the summer, is that what you mean?
That's the best time for that trick. It's when it's too hot in the kitchen that my dough leaks butter while proofing. So this prevents it. You hardly have to bring the shaped danish to room temp. .It probably would work fine right from the cooler.

I don't bake them in an oven hotter than 375.
:D
 
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
LOL, I'm sorry I wasn't very clear!

I meant as you bring to room temp. you have to keep an eye on it if it's 95 degrees in your kitchen! I suppose it can be done by checking often with a thermometer. Room temp would mean about 72 degrees, wouldn't you say?

Also, I don't think she had anything for cheese filling. What kind of cheese would you recommend? They are my very favorite!

:p
 
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Joined Nov 26, 2000
Hi everyone! Im back sorry it took so long. I dont own a 'puter so it can take awhile sometimes. And Pooh, yes I really am enjoying the conversation. :D

Here's the thing: Her rolls are so gooey inside its almost like the dough wont cook all the way. For me it's a little doughey in the center. But that is the way they like 'em. I'm thinking that the shortening is the reason for this. Butter doesn't have the ability to retain moisture as well. right? Of course she LOADS the butter on the finished dough with the cinnamon sugar before rolling and baking.

I really dont want to sound ummm..racist.NO um regionalist :D but... do you guys think that the fact that Im in the deep south could make a difference? Maybe we have a different taste in rolls than you guys.

For instance I know that raisons are OUT. I think I would be run out of the kitchen. :D

Generally speaking people here--esp. the old timers--like all there bread products super soft. Bagels aren't nearly as big here as elsewhere. I mean they are here and many people like 'em...but not like in NY or anywhere north of Tennessee. I know a little old lady that when you say you are going to "make bread" she thinks it's either biscuits or cornbread. :D

hmmm.... Well I will check the brioche recipe. That sounds like a good idea.

sigh,
thanks
eeyore
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Well, Eeyore, you'll need to cajole that little old lady till she shares her secret with you!

I understand people in the South to use a lot of lard and/or shortening as opposed to butter in other parts of the USA. It's a "regional thing" just like in the north of Italy, where they use a lot of butter and cream and in the south, they cook with olive oil. Certainly not a racist thing and nothing to be ashamed of!

:rolleyes:
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
Don't worry about your temp. literally, pop in the oven as soon as the heavy chill is gone. In a hot kitchen it might only take 10 min. If your kitchen is really hot definately try baking straight from the cooler. I might start with my oven at 350 for a few minutes then go up to 375 to set.

Cream cheese filling...if you want an exact recipe I don't have one at home here but I can post later. All it is, is like a cheese cake with less egg. Example: 8 oz. cream cheese, 1 egg, 1/4 c. sugar and whatever flavor either vanilla or lemon rind.
 
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Thank you for that, Wendy.

I would appreciate you posting the recipe at your convenience! NO RUSH!

[ May 04, 2001: Message edited by: pooh ]
 

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