Going gluten-free :(

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Joined Apr 3, 2008
I'm sorry to say I've been diagnosed celiac. This is going to mean a major change in the foods that I eat. I haven't quite accepted this yet since all I can think about are the foods I will miss forever. I know I know, gluten free alternatives can be pretty good but nothing will replace bechamel, loukoumades, pizza, pasta, and cake in the same way ever again. Anyone else here have to lead a completely gluten free lifestyle and enjoys it? I could use some advice and culinary references.
 
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Happily you do not have to give up bread! The ancient wheat varieties are okay for those with celiac! Especially if you do sourdough and do an overnight ferment of the dough to let the proteins break down some. https://pleasanthillgrain.com/buy-organic-einkorn-for-sale-bulk

http://naturalfamilytoday.com/nutrition/list-of-ancient-wheat-varieties/

Einkorn was cultivated in what is now known as Iraq. It is thought to be one of the oldest grains that is still available in the world today.

Einkorn does not contain the 33 strand peptides that are a problem for those with celiacs disease and although it is still not recommended for celiacs it may be okay for those with more mild gluten intolerance. It is good to add to breads and baked goods but will be very sticky unless put with some other types of flour.
 
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Joined Apr 25, 2017
As a bread lover, I am sorry to hear that. My dad was diagnosed 15+ years ago and we are still learning new tricks all the time.

Try the different GF all purpose flours to see which ones you like, they all have their strengths and we keep several on hand to cover different needs. Most of the brands will send you coupons if you call to ask where to buy in your area.

My folks use King Arthur GF Bread mix for baking their own bread. They bake it in a pullman pan - the tall sides help it to rise better.

Other than fresh baked / purchased keep GF bread refrigerated or frozen and toast for use.

My mom still eats wheat based bread so they have separate toasters and butter dishes - crumbs count.

Cornstarch or arrowroot for lighter gravies and sauces, cup-for-cup for beef gravies and coating meats. There are some pretty good GF panko crumbs but they can be hard to find. Rice crackers crushed up work pretty well.

When using GF flours, allow 30 minutes rest before cooking / baking to allow for better hydration. Most other grains absorb liquid slower than wheat flour and need this resting period to prevent graininess.

Ground up rolled oats can replace the flour in oat heavy recipes (i.e. oatmeal cookies).

There are naturally GF sweet baked goods - macaroons, macarons, pignoli, raspberry lamingtons, etc.

Learn how to make real buckwheat noodles - properly made soba are good :)

Bisquick's GF version makes a decent pancake, we usually add fruit to our pancakes which also helps.

The America's Test Kitchen GF cookbook has been very helpful - pizza is back on the menu.

Remember to ask for salads without croutons and remind waitstaff to leave side breads off plates.

Ask if fries are cooked in their own fryer or a communal fryer - if communal, skip the fries.

Read labels - white vinegar can be wheat based unless otherwise indicated. Also look for beer (some sauces) and malt. Malt is often added to cereals for flavor so some otherwise GF cereals are still not good.

It is a bummer of a diagnoses and will affect how you eat, but with practice and experience, you will find it easier over time. The hardest part is people thinking you are doing it as part of a fad, just say Celiac when explaining is necessary - not allergic to wheat - more and more people do understand.

Also - the truly deleterious affects on your digestive system (loss of nutrient uptake and risk of cancer) are cumulative - so depending on the severity of your physical reaction, you may be able to indulge in the occasional treat. My dad gives in to a Krispy Kreme doughnut (hot off the line) about every 6 months - he just plans to be home the next day just in case...

Good Luck!
 
347
179
Joined Apr 25, 2017
Happily you do not have to give up bread! The ancient wheat varieties are okay for those with celiac! Especially if you do sourdough and do an overnight ferment of the dough to let the proteins break down some.

Einkorn was cultivated in what is now known as Iraq. It is thought to be one of the oldest grains that is still available in the world today.

Einkorn does not contain the 33 strand peptides that are a problem for those with celiacs disease and although it is still not recommended for celiacs it may be okay for those with more mild gluten intolerance. It is good to add to breads and baked goods but will be very sticky unless put with some other types of flour.

This is not correct. Einkorn can be better for gluten sensitive people, but not celiac. They are different, though often confused.

"In contrast with more modern forms of wheat,26 there is evidence that the gliadin protein of einkorn may not be as toxic to sufferers of celiac disease. It has yet to be recommended in any gluten-free diet. Einkorn wheat does contain gluten but is different from most wheat in that it contains only 14 chromosomes as opposed to 28 in emmer or 42 in modern wheat. This alters the gluten structure which may be why it does not affect those with gluten intolerance as much as other wheat."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4488568/

Celiac is an immune system reaction to gluten - not wheat, Celiac sufferers also must avoid barley and rye.
 
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197
Joined Oct 1, 2006
Hi koukouvagia,

Maybe a shift in perspective is called for.

Think of all the new foods and flavors you can experiment with! Grocery stores have entire gluten-free sections now.

It could be so much worse. Makes my life a lot easier and happier when I remember to appreciate what I do have and not focus on what I don't/can't have.

Just a matter of perspective whether new foods and diet are a burden or an adventure with food!

I wish you the very best as you face this challenge!
 
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Joined Jan 8, 2010
I wish you all the best koukou!
I am just very glad that's not me. I am sure you are going to find a way to still eat good food though. You're inventive enough :)
I don't know enough about gluten free / celiac: Can you eat rice? If so, then there are rice noodles, rice flour and a whole world of Asian foods to explore!
 
5,670
513
Joined Sep 5, 2008
What!? Nooooooooooo .... !!? You, gluten free, Kouk'? Unbelievable. Well I'm sorry to hear.

But the good thing is you know how to cook and can be creative. And I'm sure you don't mind a challenge.

Personally I would look to cultures who don't eat gluten. Asian cultures come to mind. Asia is VAST. There are tons of cuisines there. Some may use gluten but there's a LOT of gluten-free dishes, recipes and ideas to borrow.

Rice and potatoes will most likely be your new starches. Hey at least you love potatoes!

Rice noodles, rice paper, spring rolls, deep fried rolls, rice noodles and rice bowls (Vietnamese, Korean...), rice balls (Onigiri, Japanese), risotto...

I know they make a corn couscous if you like couscous...

And I hope you like sushi!
 
Last edited:

pete

Moderator
Staff member
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Joined Oct 7, 2001
I am so sorry to hear that!!! I feel for you. Being told I have to go gluten free is one of the reoccurring nightmares I have. But as much as it sucks, you can also look at this as an opportunity to explore some new foods. I'm thinking of the vast variety of noodle dishes from Asia that use bean thread and rice noodles or the foods of India, many of which will meet the guidelines for foods to avoid if you are celiac.
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
As a bread lover, I am sorry to hear that. My dad was diagnosed 15+ years ago and we are still learning new tricks all the time.

Try the different GF all purpose flours to see which ones you like, they all have their strengths and we keep several on hand to cover different needs. Most of the brands will send you coupons if you call to ask where to buy in your area.

My folks use King Arthur GF Bread mix for baking their own bread. They bake it in a pullman pan - the tall sides help it to rise better.

Other than fresh baked / purchased keep GF bread refrigerated or frozen and toast for use.

My mom still eats wheat based bread so they have separate toasters and butter dishes - crumbs count.

Cornstarch or arrowroot for lighter gravies and sauces, cup-for-cup for beef gravies and coating meats. There are some pretty good GF panko crumbs but they can be hard to find. Rice crackers crushed up work pretty well.

When using GF flours, allow 30 minutes rest before cooking / baking to allow for better hydration. Most other grains absorb liquid slower than wheat flour and need this resting period to prevent graininess.

Ground up rolled oats can replace the flour in oat heavy recipes (i.e. oatmeal cookies).

There are naturally GF sweet baked goods - macaroons, macarons, pignoli, raspberry lamingtons, etc.

Learn how to make real buckwheat noodles - properly made soba are good :)

Bisquick's GF version makes a decent pancake, we usually add fruit to our pancakes which also helps.

The America's Test Kitchen GF cookbook has been very helpful - pizza is back on the menu.

Remember to ask for salads without croutons and remind waitstaff to leave side breads off plates.

Ask if fries are cooked in their own fryer or a communal fryer - if communal, skip the fries.

Read labels - white vinegar can be wheat based unless otherwise indicated. Also look for beer (some sauces) and malt. Malt is often added to cereals for flavor so some otherwise GF cereals are still not good.

It is a bummer of a diagnoses and will affect how you eat, but with practice and experience, you will find it easier over time. The hardest part is people thinking you are doing it as part of a fad, just say Celiac when explaining is necessary - not allergic to wheat - more and more people do understand.

Also - the truly deleterious affects on your digestive system (loss of nutrient uptake and risk of cancer) are cumulative - so depending on the severity of your physical reaction, you may be able to indulge in the occasional treat. My dad gives in to a Krispy Kreme doughnut (hot off the line) about every 6 months - he just plans to be home the next day just in case...

Good Luck!
This is so good I’m printing it all out! Thank you!! Yes I tried to eat corn flakes yesterday and had to look it up. Nope, corn flakes are not gluten free! Thanks for this very helpful post
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
Hi koukouvagia,

Maybe a shift in perspective is called for.

Think of all the new foods and flavors you can experiment with! Grocery stores have entire gluten-free sections now.

It could be so much worse. Makes my life a lot easier and happier when I remember to appreciate what I do have and not focus on what I don't/can't have.

Just a matter of perspective whether new foods and diet are a burden or an adventure with food!

I wish you the very best as you face this challenge!
Thanks for the encouragent. While this is very frightening for me it is also a relief. I’ve had so many GI issues plaguing me that I look forward to feeling a lot better and exploring new foods.
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
I wish you all the best koukou!
I am just very glad that's not me. I am sure you are going to find a way to still eat good food though. You're inventive enough :)
I don't know enough about gluten free / celiac: Can you eat rice? If so, then there are rice noodles, rice flour and a whole world of Asian foods to explore!

Thanks, I will have to explore new cuisines and let go of my solely Mediterranean persona
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
What!? Nooooooooooo .... !!? You, gluten free, Kouk'? Unbelievable. Well I'm sorry to hear.

But the good thing is you know how to cook and can be creative. And I'm sure you don't mind a challenge.

Personally I would look to cultures who don't eat gluten. Asian cultures come to mind. Asia is VAST. There are tons of cuisines there. Some may use gluten but there's a LOT of gluten-free dishes, recipes and ideas to borrow.

Rice and potatoes will most likely be your new starches. Hey at least you love potatoes!

Rice noodles, rice paper, spring rolls, deep fried rolls, rice noodles and rice bowls (Vietnamese, Korean...), rice balls (Onigiri, Japanese), risotto...

I know they make a corn couscous if you like couscous...

And I hope you like sushi!

I know can you believe it? Woe is me!
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
I am so sorry to hear that!!! I feel for you. Being told I have to go gluten free is one of the reoccurring nightmares I have. But as much as it sucks, you can also look at this as an opportunity to explore some new foods. I'm thinking of the vast variety of noodle dishes from Asia that use bean thread and rice noodles or the foods of India, many of which will meet the guidelines for foods to avoid if you are celiac.

nightmares do come true apparently!
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
There are certain things I don't understand. How old are you? Did all of a sudden you have a disease? Really not to be an A**hole but as a yacht chef, it seems only rich white people seem to be affected by this "disease". It's a fact celiac affects 1 % or less of people but some how out of cooking for max 10 yacht guests a week there is always gluten free with ridicoulas allergies. I deal with it week in and week out. Last charter in the Bahamas 3 lactose intolerant, 1 gluten free, one no seafood, 1 vegetarian, 1 deathly allergic to all nuts, sesame seeds, mustard/ mustard seeds, coconut and mango. I ran a restaurant on a small island in the south pacific for a year and probably served 30,000 people and did not have one gluten free person. On a yacht in the Caribbean I have at least one every trip out of 10 people???? Don't get me wrong, I acknowledge celiac is a real disease and I feel sorry for anyone that truly has it. I just don't understand all the glutards that claim they have it then I watch them eat a cookie or a slice of pizza. It's not easy to find gluten free stuff in the Caribbean, I take my job serious and if you say you are gluten free, I make everything gluten free and then see them eat gluten??? The quote from my last charter guest after making everything separate for 10 days " I'm kind of gluten free"??? WTF????

Maybe not the best place for this kind of rant. I can’t think of anything more inconvenient or sad than going gluten free but celiac is an autoimmune disease. I’m not just doing it to be trendy. I’m sorry you feel put out by people’s dietary restrictions.

My diagnosis still has to be confirmed with an endoscopy so fingers crossed the blood tests were wrong. My doctor doubts that very much.
 
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230
Joined Mar 21, 2008
This is not correct. Einkorn can be better for gluten sensitive people, but not celiac. They are different, though often confused.

"In contrast with more modern forms of wheat,26 there is evidence that the gliadin protein of einkorn may not be as toxic to sufferers of celiac disease. It has yet to be recommended in any gluten-free diet. Einkorn wheat does contain gluten but is different from most wheat in that it contains only 14 chromosomes as opposed to 28 in emmer or 42 in modern wheat. This alters the gluten structure which may be why it does not affect those with gluten intolerance as much as other wheat."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4488568/

Celiac is an immune system reaction to gluten - not wheat, Celiac sufferers also must avoid barley and rye.


I know what it is, my neighbor suffers from it. I use a lot of ancient wheats in baking and she can eat moderate amounts of my bread. Once or twice a week she handles just fine. It is something you need to test for each individual to see if you can tolerate it. I use the older wheats because the gliadin protein in modern wheat is way higher and it sets me off too.
 
7,675
842
Joined Apr 3, 2008
I know what it is, my neighbor suffers from it. I use a lot of ancient wheats in baking and she can eat moderate amounts of my bread. Once or twice a week she handles just fine. It is something you need to test for each individual to see if you can tolerate it. I use the older wheats because the gliadin protein in modern wheat is way higher and it sets me off too.
Good to know if I want to dabble in wheat in the future. But hopefully I won’t be “suffering” much sticking to potatoes. By golly I made a beautiful fasolada yesterday and I’d give anything to dip a crusty bread in it. Sob!!!
 
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Joined Oct 1, 2006
Yassou Kou,

When you mentioned Fasolada you triggered memories of the very first Chefs I worked for, George and Nick Karras. Brothers that looked and acted totally different, taught different lessons, strict and exacting but very fair. They laid a great foundation for my career and their Fasolada was wonderful.

You do indeed need some crusty bread...


I searched for gluten free crusty bread

This one uses a product called

"Cup4Cup gluten free flour blend"
http://www.foodiesofnewengland.com/...rtisan-bread-cup4cup-gluten-free-flour-blend/

Crusty-Artisan-Bread.jpg

There are other recipes claiming to meet your need but I think you will have to tweak something to meet your expectations.
I wonder if yeast can eat whatever it is that replaces the flour, could lead to some "sour dough type" flavors at least.
I think I might end up making a very loose version of dough so that the dough spreads out and crust ratio is maximized.

Anyway, sounds like a project...

I agree, Fasolada broth deserves something.
(Now I must make some Fasolada for myself...) Bye!
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
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Joined Oct 7, 2001
My diagnosis still has to be confirmed with an endoscopy so fingers crossed the blood tests were wrong. My doctor doubts that very much.

I hope that everything turns out fine and those blood tests are wrong, but if not, I think that a lot of people are giving you a lot of good advice. Yes, there will be a lot of things that you will miss, and a whole lot of changes that will need to be made, but I am sure that you can conquer this and it gives you a new reason to explore all sorts of new foods and cuisines...and, of course, report back to us on great new foods that you have discovered.
 
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Joined Dec 30, 2015
I'm also hoping your dx is wrong. But in the event that it's not, there is no doubt in my mind that you will figure it out and will be posting gf recipes for us to try in no time. Hang in there!
 

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