Goat Curries - Regional Differences?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kuan, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Anyone care to chime in on the differences between say a a Trinidad goat curry vs. Bangalore vs. East African?  I love goat curry but I just toss in whatever spices I feel like at the moment.  I'm sure there are specific differences.  I'm just wondering what.
     
  2. durangojo

    durangojo

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    kuan, 

     i am not familiar with african or bangalore goat curry, but i am familiar with the caribbean versions...and there are plenty!... the goat curry you get on trinidad is different than what you will get on the french island of martinque or on monserrat or on the british influenced  leeward islands or on jamaica....some islands use rabbit instead of kid....some use coconut milk and lime juice,calabaza and chayote, and some add guava jelly or hot peppers..its largely influenced by the islands history, religion, size and wealth(like what they can grow or raise etc.)...i would guess that aside from the regional differences, its the curry powder itself...west indian curry powder is totally different than indian madras, or the many thai curries...the caribbean was so influenced by african and indian workers, so some of those foods and cooking methods are intergrated into each islands' ways'... look at the roti, for example...have you ever had one?...to me they are the quintessential island food...think of it as a west indian burrito, but full of curry...goat, chicken, lobster, whelk...oh man, that along with some mango chutney, kuchela and a guiness will make your day, i promise...try it!... this  influence came from the east indian workers brought in by the colonialists to cut the sugar cane and run the  sugar mills.......the wrap, which they call a 'blanket', is made from chickpea flour, but i use really, really thin tortillas....

    joey
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2010
  3. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    During the 20 or so days I spent in Thailand in the early 80s, I ate "curry" almost every day in different towns, villages, and cities, and EVERYONE was "different"!

    To me, "curry" is more of a technique/style than a "flavor/taste/dish"
     
  4. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Alright someone here give me guidance then on your favorite style (if any)  /img/vbsmilies/smilies//smile.gif

    My last batch was onions/ginger/garlic/cumin/cardamom and finished with off the shelf garam masala.
     
  5. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    You usually associate vindaloo with Goa, but I bought a Tamil cookbook on remainder from the rack in an Indian spice store and found the basis for what's turned into my recipe for vindaloo.  Goat is my favorite. 

    Here's my main ingredient list:  goat, onions, ginger, garlic, mustard seed, tomato, fresh serranos, vinegar, salt cayenne pepper, turmeric, cumin seed, and cilantro.  Sometimes I add coconut milk too in order to manage the heat; and sometimes I marinate the goat in yogurt before browning it, which also mellows things out. 

    A list for a northern style jalfrezi would look quite similar (no vinegar though), but taste very different.  Proportions matter. 

    The differences between these two very "Indian" "curries" are partly regional but mostly the difference between vindaloo and  jalfrezi.   

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2010