Gnocchi

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by planethoff, Oct 12, 2018.

  1. planethoff

    planethoff

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    I made some gnocchi the other day using standard recipe:

    1 cup boiled potatoes mashed
    2 cups AP flour
    1 large egg

    Mix thoroughly into ball of dough.
    I rested dough 15 min.

    On floured surface I rolled into ropes, cut into 1/2” pieces, rolled on fork, put in salted boiling water until floating, leave 30 sec, drain, toss in sauce.

    They were delicious, but a bit more dense than I wanted. What can I do to make more tender? More rest? More egg? Water?
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  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Try cooking your potatoes differently to reduce the moisture and make them fluffier. Steam in the jacket, peel, and use a ricer instead of a masher.
     
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  3. planethoff

    planethoff

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    @brianshaw I think you nailed it. i did rush them and mashed a little early. But I will definitely try steaming in the jacket. And yes, ricer.
     
  4. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Many people bake them to further reduce moisture. You'll sometimes see recipes that comment that Italian potatoes tend to be older when eaten compared to in the US and so drier to start with.
     
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  5. someday

    someday

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    That also seems like a lot of flour to me. I kind of don't use a "recipe" but let the potato dictate to me how much flour to use. There are a lot of variables (moisture in flour, moisture in potato, etc) that I think doing it by "feel" is the best way. A dense/tough gnocchi sometimes is due to too much flour or the flour got overworked and develop too much gluten.

    I like to bake my potatoes whole, in the jacket. When they are cooked I usually kind of cut them open (like your going to stuff a baked potato) and then place them back in the oven for a couple more minutes to steam/dry out. This really helps, just be careful not to overdo it or you can make the potatoes tough.

    I use a pastry cutter to "chop" in the flour and eggs as well, trying not to work the dough to much and develop gluten.
     
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  6. fatcook

    fatcook

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    I agree with baking the potatoes. When I was learning, I was taught to bake them on a pan of salt to keep them light and fluffy inside.
     
  7. ivanthetrble

    ivanthetrble

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    At the CIA boot camp I attended I asked the question, "how to get lighter, fluffier gnocchi". They suggested removing the meat from your potatoes, put it on a sheet pan and pop it in the oven for a short time to help dry the potatoes a bit. It seems to help make my gnocchi lighter.
     
  8. Małgorzata

    Małgorzata

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    hmmm. I usually use leftover potatoes from yesterday's dinner. Mash them with Ikea potato masher. No baking (which might be a good idea)
    what strikes me in your recipe is the potato/flour ratio. Waaaaay to much flour!
    the proportion should be at least like 75% potatoes and 25 % flour. Or even more potatoes/less flour. In my home (Poland) we sometimes use 50%potatoes, 25% potato flour, 25% AP flour. Or instead of the AP flour we use coarsely ground (450 type) flour.