Gnocchi (Recipe wanted)

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by zane, Jun 9, 2010.

  1. zane

    zane

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    Real Simple,

    Can you guys share any of your personal recipes for it? Also, never having tried it...what is it suppose to taste like?
     
  2. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Gnocchi is, at base, a potato dumpling. But it's soft and pillowy. Think of it as an air-filled pasta.

    As with most dumplings, it's flavor is on the neutral side, and serves as a base for other flavorings.

    Traditionally, gnocchi are shaped with a special grooved board. But you can accomplish the same by pressing a fork into each one to create the sauce-holding texture.

    Here's a basic recipe:

    Gnocchi

    3 russet potatoes, peeled

    1 tsp salt

    1 tbls unsalted butter

    1 large egg

    1 large egg yolk

    1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

    Pinch nutmet

    1 3/4 cups all purpose flour (approx)

    Cut the potatoes into equal sized pieces. Put in a pot and cover with salted water. Bring the water to a simmer and cook until potatoes are fork-tender. Drain the potatoes and return them to the pot over very low heat to dry fully. While still hot, run them through a ricer into a bowl.

    Bring another pot of water to boil.

    While that's happening, make the dough. Add the butter, egg, egg yolk, salt, pepper and nutmeg tothe riced potatoes. Mix well. Incorporate enough flour to make a stiff dough. It will likely take two or three tries before you develop a feel for exactly how stiff to make it.

    Divide the dough into balls about the size of an egg. On a lightly floured surface, roll each piece into a cylinder about an inch in diameter. Cut the cylinders into pieces about an inch long, roll each piece against a fork or gnocchi board.

    Add the gnocchi to the boiling water and cook until they rise to the surface. Lift from the water with a slotted spoon or spider.

    The simplest way of enjoying them is to toss them in herbed butter (sage is traditional). But gnocchi in gorgonzola sauce is probably the most popular way they're served.
     
  3. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Found some gnocchi in the supermarket chiller section today - they were like lead bullets /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif  One did not purchase them.

    Think I'm going to have a go at them some time, just need some spare time.

    KYH - we don't have Russett potatoes here - are they waxy/floury?
     
  4. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Russetts are the standard baking-type potato in the U.S., DC. Use whatever is comparable down there. I believe it's the starchiness you want when making gnocchi. Just guessing, but a waxy potato might make the dumplings too dense. Highlight of gnocchi is their airy, pillow-like texture.

    I've tried supermarket gnocchi in the past, both fresh, from the cooler section, and dry. You were wise to skip them.
     
  5. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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    Hi  :)

    This article, from SfGate  has really helped me turn out some fantastic gnocchi.

    The keys that helped me make the step up from mediocre gnocchi would be how I handled the dough. I use a ricer now and handle the dough as little as possible. Also using as little flour to get the job done helped too.

    I hope the article could help...

    dan
     
  6. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Great article, Dan. Thanks for posting the link.
     
  7. cookingdude

    cookingdude

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    At home cook
  8. oregonyeti

    oregonyeti

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    The first time I made gnocchi (about 27 years ago), it was with pumpkin puree rather than potatoes. The recipe called for serving it with melted butter with sage. I sprinkled parmesan cheese on it. That was good stuff, and I still make it about the same way sometimes.
     
  9. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Squash gnocchi is a great variation, OY. I usually make it with butternut rather than pumpkin, as such, but I imagine it's close to being allee-allee-same-same.

    I'm growing a new to me heirloom this year called Kentucky Flat Tan Field pumpkin, said to be one of the finest culinary squashes available. Gnocci is one of the things I've got planned for it.

    Folks new to making gnocci need to realize there is a learning curve. I well remember my first attempt. Swore I would never make it again, not if those chewy little dough rocks were how it came out. But over time I developed the feel for it.
     
  10. oregonyeti

    oregonyeti

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    That sounds good! I might experiment more with gnocchi.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2010
  11. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Me, I've got to experiment more with spelling it correctly. Gnocchi, with an aitch; gnocchi, with an aitch. Sooner or later I'll get it. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/redface.gif
     
  12. zane

    zane

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    I'm not really confident enough to make the dough with out seeing it in person at least once, a picture isn't giving me the detail I want to be able to shape it correctly.
     
  13. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    L'audace, l"audace, toujours l'audace, Zane.

    Always remember Julia Child's advice: don't be afraid.

    The worst that can happen is that the gnocchi are a bit on the doughy side; you can't really ruin them entirely. The only purpose of the groves---whether made with a fork or a traditional gnocchi board---is to create a surface that helps the sauce stick.

    Even if you lack the groves there's nothing harmed. Basically, you're looking for little cylinders of dough, measuring 3/4 to 1 inch long and wide.

    Go for it!