Getting the crispy pizza crust!

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by junerose, Apr 2, 2016.

  1. junerose

    junerose

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    Hey there yall!

    I'm running a pizza pop-up restaurant in Los Angeles and I'm using a dough recipe I've worked beautifully in wood ovens before but am the space I currently work only has a conventional oven. I love the taste of the dough but it doesn't get quite crispy and crunchy enough without the extra heat from the wood oven. Wondering if there's something I should change in the recipe to help it crisp up. My first idea was adding sugar to the recipe, because I currently don't use any of it. 

    I also have access to a grill and a salamander in the space and was thinking about having them both going and cooking the pizzas on a stone on the grill and finishing the top in the salamander. Anyone done anything similar to this?

    The dough recipe has hi-gluten, bread and whole wheat flour, oil, salt, yeast and water. It'd be nice to have the wood stove again but oh well!

    Thanks a lot. 
     
  2. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    In cooking my pizza at home, I use 75% 00 Caputo flour mixed with 25% semolina in my dough (70% hydration) and bake either at 11 minutes @ 475F or around 15-20 minutes @ 450F and my crust is light and nice and crispy.  Oh yes, and it's baked in a blue steel pan from Paderno World Cuisine.
     
  3. chefross

    chefross

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    Welcome to ChefTalk...
    Try brushing the rim of your pizza dough with olive oil to help crisp it

    500 degrees on the oven will help also. You have to experiment.
     
  4. mike9

    mike9

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    If you're using a stone(s) leave 'em in the oven @ 500 to stay hot.  Corn meal on your peel for lube and you should get a good crust.  Are you letting your dough rise?  I rise mine and I also cook mine in a blue steel pan rubbed with bacon drippings and cook near the roof of the oven.  Before I start topping my pie I put the crust in the oven to set - it stays crispier that way.

    If I were doing a volume pop up with a conventional oven I'd look into getting a couple of "kiln shelves" from a ceramic supply.  Same material as a round stone, but bigger, thicker and a variety of sizes and shapes.  You could gang some together for a bigger surface area.  Less expensive than thick steel plates too.  Good luck with your project.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2016
  5. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Inquiring minds need to know:
    1. How much bake time for the crust to crisp?
    2. Total baking time including the time for the crust alone to crisp?
    3. Does your pan set at the very top of your oven or in the upper third of your oven (approx 6 inches below the top of the oven chamber)???