Getting paid to compile and/or edit recipes

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by chrislehrer, Jan 25, 2017.

  1. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    So I saw a job listing recently. According to the ad copy, a professional chef wants someone to turn his rough recipes into clean recipe-style prose. He doesn't assume that the writer will test the recipes, just render them into something that looks like a modern cookbook.

    Fine, but then he says what he's going to pay.

    Now editing and such varies widely, but I've never heard of an editing job paying less than about $10/hour, and usually it's $25+, depending on the field and the editor's qualifications. The "hour" is scaled to number of words, or pages, or something like that.

    By my rough calculations, this chef expects to pay something on the order of $2.50/hour, though he's estimating based on an entirely opaque per-recipe scale.

    Has anyone ever done work like this? Any idea what it pays? I'm sure I don't want this job, that's easy, but I'm wondering where the price range ought to be.
     
  2. chefross

    chefross

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    How are you going to take a "rough recipe" and turn it into a usable form without testing it?

    Who is going to pay for the ingredients to that effect?

    I would take another look at this and ask some questions....
     
  3. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    The internet is full of untested, and in many cases, non
    workable recipes.
    All written up into "clean recipe-style prose".
    Sounds like this "chef" just wants to make himself a
    name and some money writing yet another cookbook
    by doing as litle work...and as little expense, as possible.
    Probably not the writing type, so he wants to pay someone
    peanuts to make him some money.
    If he doesnt want to publish, maybe hes simply out to
    record his work for posterity. Either way, a few minutes
    on the phone with the guy would speak volumes.
    A fellow chef who can write might have fun testing these
    things out with him, but the chef might feel threatened by that,
    depending on his intentions.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2017
  4. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Very much my reading, yes.
     
  5. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I dunno... Lets just play devils advocate for a minute.

    This is my idea if a "rough recipie":

    600 sugar
    400 butter
    200 egg

    1000 flour

    This is a recipie for sweet dough that I've been using for over 30 years, Ive scaled it up as much as 6 times, and down by 1/4. I assume everyone I give it too understands that the sugar and butter are creamed, the eggs added one by one, vanilla and salt are added, and the flour sifted.

    That being said, in the past when I have applied for a restaurant business license, one of the health dept. requirements are that all recipies have to be formatted using the haccp protocol before even inspections can take place. I've also been in the position where I step into a new kitchen where there are NO recipies, and I have to generate idiot proof recipies for the entire kitchen as fast as possible.

    Then again what you and many others read into that advertisement may also be very true. One thing about the cookbook biz is that glossy pictures rule, the recipies are a distant second......
     
  6. cws4322

    cws4322

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    I was paid $25/hour to edit recipes I was reimbursed for the ingredients because part of the job was to test the recipe as well. I was also reimburse mileage for shopping for the ingredients. Many of the recipes required substantial rewriting to make the instructions so that a home cook could reproduce the recipe. I had a lot of fun editing and testing recipes and would love to do it again!
     
  7. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    Lol. That's grams, not pounds, right?
     
  8. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Yup.

    Biggest mixer I've ever used was a 80 qt, but I don't think a thousand pounds of flour would fit in that one....
     
  9. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Thank you. Exactly the info I was looking for.