Getting a Knife! Takamura?

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Joined Oct 20, 2016
I'm looking at a Takamura Gyuto and I really like the grip and look of the blade. I've been in the kitchen awhile and am wanting to go to to a culinary institute soon. From reviews the blade sounds really nice. I've been mostly using Wusthof's and Shun's and can't complain about them. Just trying to find a knife that suits me. looking for that damascus style and I haven't used a blade without an ergonomic grip so I'm hesitant about buying one but not sure how big of a difference it would make which steers me towards the Takamura. I also checked out Gesshin Ajikataya 210mm, Gonbei 210mm Hammered Damascus Wa-Gyuto, Zakuri Aogami Super Kurouchi Wa-Gyuto, and Kagayaki Gekido KGR-2 Gyuto. Any input is much appreciated.
 
1,061
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Joined Aug 6, 2015
Very very different types of knives you've listed there. Do you have a rough budget range? Aiming for thick or thin? Stainless, carbon, or anything is good? Do you have space to prep with bigger than a 210mm?

How are you going to sharpen the new knife?
 
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Joined Oct 20, 2016
Relatively thin. I want it to not feel weightless but I'm looking on the lighter side. I'm fine putting in any effort to clean the knife so stainless is nice but not by any means a necessity. I have room to prep with a bigger knife if need be. I'd prefer a 180-240mm though. I currently only have an honing rod but would be up for getting a stone. Price range is a little loose, I'd rather not spend over 500 but if it will hold up for a nice long time I'm fine spending a little extra.
 
2,855
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
Jon is pretty explicit about the knives her carries, and you can always discuss the matter with him when he returns from Japan, and you can add the Ikazuchi to the list.

The Kagayaki is a bit pricey, for a lot less you can get the Shiro Kamo if you want faux damascus.  For a bit more there is the Tanaka ironwood (very arguably the best in R2 steel) and the Takamura Hana.  Then there is the Itonomon Kasumi that Millions turned us all onto.

Lots of good knives here and how much you really want to spend will be a significant determining factor in the final choice, along with availability perhaps also.
 
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Joined Mar 6, 2017
Did you end up choosing? 

TAKAMURA is by far the way to go (when compared to shun/wusthof). Edge retention, ease of use, ergonomics, sharpening ease, thinness, and beauty (I think) puts it at the head of the pack. 

Granted, the Takamura is more brittle than wusthofs--choose your task accordingly. 

For fruits, veggies, and boneless meats, the Takamura migaki R2 (HSPS) is unparalleled.
 
2,855
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
The Migaki is a nice knife, I have one also, but it appears the OP here lost interest when the subject of sharpening came up, happens often.
 
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Joined Oct 12, 2017
I have a Takamura r2 gyuto 8” (ish) and a Hiromoto 10” both beautiful and amazing. The Takamura is my go to. She is thin and a bit delicate but the edge retention and effortless cuts are impressive. All veggies with the right rock and slice are laser precision. But pick your battles she is delicate. However I also prefer the challenge of a maintaining the edge of a 140mm(?) hard steel heavy blade. So just get something and flex it out boi
 

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