Garlic ??

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by surfcast, Sep 24, 2018.

  1. surfcast

    surfcast

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    How do you like to sauté your garlic ? Do you let your oil reach temperature, before adding it in.
    Or do you combine your oil and garlic in the pan cold, and let it reach temperature ? Or does not make any difference either way ?
     
  2. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    There is a big difference and it all depends on what you are cooking. Garlic is sensitive! It burns easily and even the way you cut it affects its flavor. I would never just put garlic in a hot pan and sauté it by itself. That will just get you burnt bitter garlic. So it all depends on the dish, what are you making?
     
  3. french fries

    french fries

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    I don't have one unique technique, I use them all. As Koukouvagia stated it all depends what you're cooking and what results you want. For example placing raw garlic in cold oil and slowly heating up the oil will let the garlic flavor infuse in the oil which will carry the flavor more evenly across your dish.
     
  4. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Often when doing Asian style stir fry, I put lightly crushed cloves of garlic in the wok with the cold oil. When the garlic is browned and fragrant, scoop it out ans start cooking. Italian stuff I also tend towards garlic slivers started in cold oil, along with some red pepper flakes. And depending on the dish involved, more garlic in another form such as minced or crushed may go in at a later point in the cooking process.

    mjb.
     
  5. lagom

    lagom

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    I do garlic in evoo in my over. Take a dozen whole heads and cut the top off, into a pan and filled with evoo unti it covers then into the oven at 90c( apx 190ish f) for maybe 6 hours. I put the oil through a fine sieve and store it for cooking/dressing or anything you want some garlic for. The garlic I pop out of the heads and now I have a nice purée that I can add to any type of sauce, cooking oil ect that dissolves almost instantly.
     
  6. rick alan

    rick alan

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    One way I like is to thin slice, <0.5mm, and toss on a dish either just before removing from heat, or after plating even, makes a wonderful garnish for many dishes, pasta most notably. You do need a very, very sharp knife for this, not for the typical kitchen knife that has never known anything better than the factory edge.
     
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  7. drirene

    drirene

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    Agreed @rick alan. This method is also wonderful for grilled vegetables, particularly charred red peppers. Add EVO, salt and pepper and feast!
     
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  8. french fries

    french fries

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    Ooooh yummy. :)
     
  9. Małgorzata

    Małgorzata

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    when stir-fry I toss aromatics such as garlic, ginger (and sometimes hot peppers) to the hot hot hot oil - but I just let it sit there for a few seconds (so it won't get brown and bitter) and quickly ad something that will release juice like onions and other vegetables or meat.
    When playing cucine italiana :) , for some dishes (like Aglio e olio for example) I prefer adding garlic to cold olive oil and simmer rather than fry - though the garlic musn't be raw after this. It might not be orthodox way to do this but it is the way I prefer. If I start with pancetta, or the guanciale (good heavens) than I add garlic later, just before other vegetables or tomatoes.
    In Polish kitchen, Garlic is more often used for marinading or rubbing meat. so it hits the pan together with it.