Garlic oil & botulism

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by mikez, Feb 22, 2011.

  1. mikez

    mikez

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    So ever since I saw Chef Bayless make his Mojo de Ajo I have been making my version of this. Its almost a garlic confit where you cook chopped garlic & salt under oil @ 325 cook for 45 mins, add lime juice and cook until done. I have made different varieties with red pepper flakes and other items. I know he used the lime juice to help boost the acidity so botulism does not grow and also we keep it in the fridge. I wanted to confirm that when I use something like a garlic infused vinegar or something like that will have the same effect and cause an environment that is harder for botulism to grow. I don't keep this mixture for long but I do make a decent size batch which lasts a month or so.
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    The right pH (acidity) does stop the bacteria/spores from growing. But with vinegar, it's not just the acidity, but that the vinegar does not exclude oxygen as oil does. Botulin (not the correct term, bu it escapes me at the moment) are safe if they metabolize in the presence of oxygen. It's when they metabolize without "free" oxygen that they produce the toxin.

    There are too many variables to say that cooking the garlic and oil with  some added acidity  makes it safe.  How much remains at the end and is it enough is the question. Not something the home cook can manage easily, nor most pros.

    Make small batches, keep it refrigerated, use it quickly.
     
  3. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I dont know how much salt was used , but by creating a saline type solution would also help preserve.
     
  4. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Batch size seems to be as important as ingredients.

    Although USDA recommends against it, the folks at Ball developed a safe recipe for pickled garlic. But they caution that it should only be put up in 1/2 pint jars. The original recipe was:

    1 3/4 lbs garlic bulbs

    2 1/2 cups white vinegar

    1 cup dry white wine

    1 tbls pickling salt

    1 tbls sugar

    1 tbls oregano

    5-6 dried whole chili peppers

    Separate bulbs into cloves. Peel.

    Combine vinegar, wine, salt, sugar and oregano in a saucepan. Bring to boil. Simmer one minute. Remove from heat. Add cloves. Stir one minute.

    Put one pepper in each half-pint jar. Fill jars to within one inch of top with cloves. Add hot liquid, leaving 3/4 inch headspace. Process in boiling water bath ten minutes.

    In later editions of the Ball Blue Book they published a simpler recipe:

    6 cups peeled colves, garlic

    1 tsp canning salt

    1 cup sugar

    3 cups vinegar.

    Blanch garlic in boiling water for 1 minute. Drain. Combine sugar, salt and vinegar in a large saucepot. Bring to a boil. Pack hot garlic into hot jars, leaving 1/4 inch heatspace. Ladle hot liquid over garlic, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Adjust two-piece caps. Process 10 minutes in a boiling water canner.

    Again, this recipe is designed for 1/2 pint jars only, and makes about six of them.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2011
  5. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Yesterday I purchased and processed a load of ginger . I put it in my robo then added lemon juice, water, and canola oil I then put in plastic wide mouth bottles. I will now see how log it last and check for flavor retention.. Reason I did this way I saw an alredy processed brand in store and this is ingredients they used.
     
  6. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    No longer than yesterday evening, I was watching Giorgio Locatelli preparing a mushroom risotto.

    He took and showed a small stainless container in which he had put olive oil and chopped raw garlic, both to be used. His comment; "...you can make this once a week or so and you can store it in the fridge for like 2-3 weeks...".  Well, well...

    @KYH; I distinctly remenber that a long time ago, I helped peeling a gazillion very tiny white onions, one by one, to be preserved in vinegar. Same with gurkins (cornichons), but these hadn't to be peeled of course. Both were given a dry salt bath and stayed in there for one night. After that they were rinced and put in jars,  hot vinegar was poured over them; don't know what else went in the jars. A little similar to the first recipe you posted. The jars weren't even closed air-tight but put in glaas jars with a red sealing rubber and a metal "muzzle" on top. We ate the result mostly with charcuterie and bread, even many, many months later. Absolutely delicious! I don't see any reason why this couldn't be done with garlic. Garlic wasn't that popular at all when I was a kid, so I never saw it being preserved!
     
  7. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Ed, could you explain why the oil? Unless this is the base of a salad dressing, I don't think it contributes much of anything. And it does increase the risk factor. Granted, the risk is on the low side. But it's one that can be avoided altogether.

    With the addition of oil it is crucial that you store the ginger in the fridge

    FWIW, here's a recipe for pickled ginger:

    10 oz fresh ginger

    Boiling water

    1 1/3 cups rice vinegar

    3 tbls cider vinegar

    2 tbls white vinegar

    1/2 cup plus 1 tbls sugar

    4 tsp kosher salt

    Peel ginger. Cut into paper-thin coins or slivers. Place in a heatproof bowl and cover with boiling water. Let stand two minutes. Drain.

    Combine remaining ingredients in a non-reactive saucepan. Stir over moderate heat until sugar and salt dissolve and the liquid is near steaming.

    Put ginger in a clean glass jar and pour in the hot liquid. Let stand until cool, then cover and refrigerate.

    Notes: If you want that pink color of Japanese pickled ginger, add a tablespoon or two of beet juice to each jar.

              Lemon juice can be subbed for the cider vinegar if you prefer that flavor.

              Larger quantities can be processed in a boiling water bath for long-term storage.
     
  8. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    You also need to remember ed that they jar you saw in the store was probably pressure processed for safety, perhaps irradiated, not just mixed and stored.
     
  9. mikez

    mikez

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    Hmm, so I wonder if it is SLIGHTLY safer to use vinegar instead of lemon or lime juice.. I do not think it is a huge factor though since it is only a couple Tbs of vinegar added anyway. Certainly pickling garlic in vinegar is very different then adding a little bit to a cooked oil garlic solution.. I think maybe I will just make it in smaller batches to be safe...
     
     
  10. konww002

    konww002

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    Botulin comes from clostridium type of microorganism; C. botulinum. they are anaerobic, which means they can only live in the absence of oxygen. having garlic to be infused into oil may pose some risk of clostridium growth, as well as in vinegar. however, as vinegar is acidic, it is a inhibitor for clostridium as they do not like acidic enviroment. i remembered my professor telling me to be careful of infused oils because clostridium spores could survive very high heat treatment. like Mikez mentioned, make small batches, refrigerate and use them as fast as you could to prevent the risk of clostridum growing from their spore form.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2011
  11. chefedb

    chefedb

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    KY  I really don't know why the oil . I just followed what it said on their label .. I did not want pickled ginger, I have that and that will last a year or more. now it's a waiting game I will check he ginger weekly to see how it retains color and flavor, Thats how I learn., by doing it myself.
     
  12. crabapple

    crabapple

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    I grow my own organic garlic.

    I am storing my garlic in cool dry place or whole peeled cloves in vinegar.

    I do think lemon/lime juice for salsa would be a welcome change, for storing cloves.

    I like the fire in the "Georgian Fire" garlic best for home made salsa.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 6, 2014