Garden Update - eggplants and cantaloupes are coming in.

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by nicko, Aug 8, 2010.

  1. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Hey everyone. Planted my garden late (early June) this year so I am just starting to get some harvest. My cucumber plants are a machine. It is incredible how many cucumbers we are harvesting from just a few plants (4). I also am very happy with my rain barrel. I recommend installing two of them if you can. What I do now is that when I use up the water from my main barrel I use a small pump to pump water from the second barrel (off the house)  to the barrel near the garden. The pump cost me about 99.00 and it was a good investment.

    I have to say the only thing I have had problems with are my zucchini. Since I had no idea how big they get I over planted my container and lost all but two of the plants. The two that are left seem to be doing ok now so hopefully I can get a few zucchinis out of them yet.

    Here are some updated shots. Very excited to see my eggplants and cantaloupes coming in.

    There are more shots in my album:

    http://www.cheftalk.com/gallery/album/view/id/891/user_id/7889

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    Last edited: Aug 8, 2010
  2. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Not sure what variety those eggplant are, Nicko, but given their depth of color and shiny skin, they look ready to go despite their smaller size. If they start to turn dull, pick 'em quick, cuz that's a sign they're past their prime.

    My experimental planting of Sugar Peas (a cowpea)  is just getting ready to set flowers; so I'm confidient it will set fruit and I'll have seed for a full crop next season. And now that we've had a few nights of cooler weather my peppers are finally setting fruit. Both the poblano and cubanelle are trying to make up for lost time. Hooray!

    Big success story here is the Kentucky Flat Tan Field Pumpkin. They are going gangbusters, with at least 20 of them out there (hard to tell in the jungle). The Flat Tan is said, by the pastry chef at Blackberry Inn, to be the best culinary pumpkin available. So I'm anxious to see how it does on the table.
     
  3. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    You know I don't think they are ready yet. I picked the large one but almost as soon as they started to show the fruit they the skin was that dark. We will see.

    Man show some photos of the pumpkins they sound beautiful.
     
  4. leeniek

    leeniek

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    Nice pics, Nicko!  I'm glad your garden is doing so well.  Mine.. well that's another story.  The house next door is a rental and the fence between our properties has been an ongoing issue for a couple of years and on Saturday they finally fixed the fence.  (I think the order from property standards had something to do with that) So my garden is beside their fence and in order to fix it they needed access to both sides of their property... and now all I have left is blackberries and a couple of shrubs.  It's ok though.. I do have a quarter share from an organic farm coming my way in the fall so I will at least enjoy local seasonal produce and... next year I can plant my garden with confidince!
     
     
  5. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Wish I could post pix, Nicko, but I don't even own a digital camera, let alone know how to download.

    About half the pumpkins have changed color already. But it likely will be well into September or October before they're actually ripe. But the way things are going, looks like I'll be canning a lot of pumpkin this season. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif

    Ironic story behind them, btw. I am an avid collector of Kentucky heirloom veggies, and have a fairly good fix on what's around. But despite my passion for Kentucky heirlooms I had never heard of them until about two years ago. But I didn't learn of them from a grower.

    In one of Food Arts' what's in store for the fall articles they included the folks from Blackberry Farm. The pastry chef provided the dessert entry, and mentioned both that she considers them the finest culinary pumpkin available, and that John Coykendall grows them for her. John, whom I've known for years, is the horticulturest at Blackberry, and grows many of the veggies they use---all of them heirlooms.

    Anyway, I called John, and he sent me seed. Wasn't able to get them in, last year, so they had to wait until now. Looks like it may have been worth the wait.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2010
  6. bughut

    bughut

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    I'm envious Nicko. For the 2nd year running I've run out of growing season for my eggplants. Cucumbers are fabulous. They just keep on giving. I've been picking them small for weeks but now i've pinched the tops and waiting for some big ones...They'll be this years bread n butter pickles.

    Love the pics. I'll have to practice with the camera and figure how to downlad properly. My zuchinis are worthy of the gallery
     
  7. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Last edited: Aug 11, 2010
  8. fr33_mason

    fr33_mason

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    Being in Chicago means cooler nights and the result is smaller fruits.  Eggplants of course belong to the nightshade family so plants like petunias, tomatoes and peppers are cousins to eggplant. Six to eight hours of direct sunlight is appreciated by eggplants and if you have a spot that can remain warmer at night with really rich soil, you will get larger fruits.

     Food for thought for next season. 

     Judging by those pics I will say that good things come in small packages so nice job Nicko.