ganache using different choc. %

415
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Joined Jan 15, 2001
I have always used for my ganache Callebaut 811. Equal parts chocolate to cream(80%)-butter(20 %)-glucose(8 %). I have been trying out darker chocolates(meaning choc. liquor or cocoa solids % is higher) and notice that my ganache recipe doesn't work as well. It's thicker, sets firmer and has more of a tendency to break. It's baffling me. The chocolate I switched to also has a slightly higher % of cocoa butter.

I could probably add more cream to thin it out, but like I said, I've always worked with equal parts choc. to cream in a ganache formula.
 
49
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Joined Mar 12, 2001
I had that same problem a while back. I tried using a 72% and it broke everytime. I even used almost 2 part choc to 1 part cream. and when i took a class in chicago the instructor said that making a ganach with a high % cocoa butter choc is very difficult I guess cause the total amount af fat . good luck
Danno
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
I've also been bumming out lately using Callebaut and I think it might be 811. Today I made some with 2 lb cream and 3 lb chocolate. I steeped some ginger in the cream with some raspberry compound, then strained it onto the chocolate. After I stirred it smooth it looked like it was going to break, so I boiled another pint of cream and stirred it in and it looked ok. I'm going to scoop it, round it and make truffles out of it.
 
415
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Joined Jan 15, 2001
bighat, never had a problem with 811. The one I'm using now is 831, a step darker and I'm using the callets. I really think it has to do with the fat content of the choc. Will investigate further.
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
I'm not really sure what the number is. I ordered some Callebaut couverture and they ran a bunch of numbers by me and I wound up with Schokinagg couverture and it was real nice to work with. Maybe my problem has been that I make it 2 chocolate to 1 cream.
 
1,839
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Joined May 29, 1999
to save a breaking ganach you can add cold heavy cream, this is done by eye so be careful. also you can try to add some (save me but it has worked for me) water to the blend, it seems to pull the fats together. i use hot water, perhaps on some level it helps melt the sugar in the chocolate and the fats in the chocolate and the cream find a common ground. try 10% using a small batch to see if it works for your high cocoa butter chocolate ganaches.
happy trails.......
 
2,938
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Joined Mar 4, 2000
I usually use the 835, which is pretty close to the 811 ( a bit more viscous, as recall). They've sent me the 60/40 by accident a couple of times, and I just added more cream. No problem at all. As long as you know what your mix should look like when it's hot, it should set up to the same firmness as with the other chocolate.
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
I just looked at the Callebaut website and now I'm more confused than ever. What's up with the viscosity numbers? Some are a number, and others are a letter. Is a low number thinner, or thicker? This is way too complicated. The party I was making the truffles for got canceled due to the death of a grandfather of the bar mitzvah boy. Can you imagine cancelling a $155 a plate dinner on 24 hour notice? We all got short hours this weekend as a result. Good thing monday is a holiday.
 
415
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Joined Jan 15, 2001
My purveyor gave me a sheet listing the fat content and cocoa solids of Callebaut. If I remember, I will post the info. when I bring home the sheet from work. I certainly did notice that the 60/40 that momoreg mentioned was way more viscous. And more viscous means more cream in the ganache.

By the way, thanks everyone for sharing your thoughts! It's always so helpful.
 
1,046
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Joined Apr 19, 2001
As I read formulas for different types of ganache - i.e., a 'poured' ganache for a cake, or a more solid ganache for a filling or truffle, it seems that everyone has their own % of cream/chocolate. Some I've tried for a fimer ganache have never solidified, and had to add more chocolate to get the consistency I wanted.

Are there any 'tried and true' formulas for the different types? And would the formulas also include white chocolate or milk chocolate? I do use good white chocolate (usually Lindt), and either Lindt or Ghiardelli milk chocolate.

Thank you - from the ganache novice!!!
 
2,938
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Joined Mar 4, 2000
I use the same formula for everything (glazing, filling cakes, filling truffles). It's more choc. to cream: 7#8 oz choc. to 3.5 qt. cream. Definitely add more choc. if you are using milk or white choc., because it doesn't set up as hard.
 
415
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Joined Jan 15, 2001
I do the same thing as momoreg, except my formula has 1 part butter instead of cream(5 # chocolate to 2 qts. cream and 1# butter). If I warm it it's poured ganache, if I let it set and scoop out it's truffles and if I cool and whip it up it's a filling. Very versatile stuff.
 
1,839
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Joined May 29, 1999
for a firmer end product you can add more cocoa butter, 'specially for white chocolate ganach.
 
1,046
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Joined Apr 19, 2001
Thanks, all! It's so confusing to see different %s in books by supposedly reputable authors/chefs/instructors! They all seem to use varying amounts, and I've had a couple really bomb on me - made great hot fudge sauce, tho!
 
1,640
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Joined Mar 6, 2001
I never had the choice of which chocolate brand I was using so I can't talk chocolate brands. I never had any problems....

But as far as different recipe for different purposes I do vary mine. For truffles I like to whip my ganche until it's very light and pipe it out. Then dip to coat. I like the texture of this light as air filling that melts out in your mouth. If I need cocoa dusted truffles I don't whip my ganche.

D. You might want to look over at www.uspastry.org
look at the guest forum the first question to Florain Bellanger (from Fauchon) is about ganche. It won't answer your question but I thought his recipe for poured ganche coating looked interesting (from a french chef) he uses condensed milk!

MBrown, I don't understand why you choose to add more cocoa butter instead of more chocolate. Can you explain please?
 
1,839
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Joined May 29, 1999
cocoa butter will add strength to the ganach, if your white chocolate ganach is not setting up add some cocoa butter and you gain more cocoa butter flavor.
when enrobing you can add cocoa butter to thin the chocolate if it is too thick.
 
415
10
Joined Jan 15, 2001
To bighat:

Yeah, I also looked in the Callebaut website ---I didn't realize they had so many different types of chocolate according to viscosity. A letter before the number(A-L) represents 1% less cocoa butter. So if it has the letter L, it means the chocolate is going to be quite viscous. This explains why I once ordered L60/40 and I thought it was weird why it was so viscous. If it has a number, it usually means the cocoa butter % goes up 1%, so the chocolate is more flowing.

Guess I did learn something today.
 
4
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Joined Apr 20, 2002
I use callets chocolate for ganache 58% or 72% and it doesnt break . breaking is due to extra whipping or stirring. no need to whisk. for truffles put some butter in the chocolate.
truffles: 1 liter of cream. 2 kg of chocolate 400 gr of buter.
good luke for every one
 

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