fusion food

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by cookm, Aug 28, 2000.

  1. cookm

    cookm

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    What do you guys think about fusion? I went to look at Eos' ( a restaurant in San Francisco) and I saw caesar salad with GINGER. I just couldn't get into it. But then when I go to my fave Vietnamese place, they serve a scrumptious duck soup. The leg is expertly braised, the stock is flavorful and clear, there are fried shallots sprinkled over as garnish...I love that Vietnamese/French style. There's a lot of *fusion* happening here because of all the Asian and Latin American influences, but it just seems forced, awkward, and nasty sounding. Any thoughts?

    [This message has been edited by cookM (edited August 29, 2000).]
     
  2. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Yep~fusion can be nasty.
    I made a shrimp creole arincini....won a Mardi Gras contest...wonderful, but the components went together. I donot like my food overfingered, sometimes the stacking thing is just overplayed with food.
    Fusion is not going on too much here anymore.
    Probably a good thing.
     
  3. wambly

    wambly

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    I never have thought of Vietnamese as fusion.. although it is probably one of the original east/west combinations.

    Something different about a cuisine that is formed over many years compaired to someone making a special for the night with truffles, soy, and ginger....the latter being what I refer to as conFusion.
     
  4. nick.shu

    nick.shu

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    i personally dont have a problem with mixtures of cuisines. The major thing to bear in mind, is that, balance rules. If something tastes like s**t, it will taste like s**t.

    Unless you take the time to experiment or your background knowledge permits you to know, how are you going to know?
     
  5. chefjohnpaul

    chefjohnpaul

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    Fusion can be outstanding if done right, but first the chef needs to really understand the ingredients and techniques of what he is trying to fuse. I hope the days are over where cooks are dousing everything with soy and ginger and calling it fusion, that's not fusion, that's wanna'be. I think everyone should get off the bandwagon, get down to earth, know their ingredients, techniques, where they want to take it and stop trying to be Roy Yamaguchi for the sake of being hip. Fusing flavors and ingredients is great but give the dining public something that has substance and is well grounded.
     
  6. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    NY TIMES had an interesting dish in Diner's Journal this am...
    Bread pudding soaked in coconut milk, on a layer of pineapple bits surrounded in basil syrup, with a sheet of burnt sugar and a scoop of ginger ice cream.
    HUMMMM sounds pretty yummy....now what type of basil..Thai??and just throw it in a warm simple syrup?
     
  7. chef mark hayes

    chef mark hayes

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    Fusion for the sake of fusion can be ridiculous in hands of someone who doesn't have knowledge of or respect for classic preparations and techniques. And by classic I don't just mean "french". Because we are a Globally-Influenced Restaurant, Many people ask if that means fusion, I say NO WAY! It simply means that the menu is not bound by one type of cuisine, but influenced by many (separate but equal) regions of the world. However we do not mix the cuisines on one plate, but rather present a dish as close to authentic as we can. Now, as far as Vietnamese Cuisine goes (or many others for that matter), we as chefs need to know a little history; Vietnam was a French colony! So I can't help but think that they would be influenced by their colonizers (if that's a word!)

    ------------------
    M.W.H.
     
  8. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    My definition of fusion is taking a dish and adding ingrediants from other cultures...
    ie..bread pudding which is Creole and adding Asian ingrediants. Or Shrimp creole arincini which is an Italian classic (fried risotto balls stuffed with mozzerella) and adding New Orleans ingrediants...spicy boiled shrimp, shrimp stock, garlic, peppers, celery, onion to the arborio rice.
    Then instead of Marinara make a Creole sauce.
    What do you guys think, is this the fusion you know???
     
  9. isa

    isa

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    Too much of anything is not good. It is nice to mix flavours in a dish but too much flavours and you don't know what you're eating. Some ingrdients are best standing on their own.


    I went to a cooking demonstration a few weeks ago. The chef was preparing mahi mahi. He reduce the fish to purée and made some kind of quenelle qith spinach and other ingredients. In the end you couldn't even taste the mahi mahi. At 30$ a pound I would have prefer a dish that brought out the flavour of the fish instead of a dish that had so much different things in it you had no idea what you were eating.


    Sisi
     
  10. cookm

    cookm

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    I agree; that mahi mahi sounds really nasty.
    Here's another example of some fusion that I thought sounded nasty!!! A cook friend of mine actually had to do this a couple Christmases ago. Her heart wasn't into it at all, but she had to do it.

    ...Yorkshire pudding with fish essence...
    [​IMG]
     
  11. cape chef

    cape chef

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    your kidding aren't you?
    That is the most aweful thing I have ever heard of
     
  12. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    LOL Gross! That goes under the gross food thread. What do you serve that with????
    Prime Rib with Korean Fish Sauce, What wine would you serve? The one with the cow on the Btl or the one with the fish? (have you guys seen that new line of wines for those that need visual cues)

    Has Gray Kunz finished writing his book yet?
    Jean Georges' book is great...dried orange dust!

    [This message has been edited by shroomgirl (edited September 02, 2000).]

    [This message has been edited by shroomgirl (edited September 03, 2000).]
     
  13. isa

    isa

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    Yup the mahi mahi cost around 30$ a pound here in Quebec and that is when it is available. At that price I'll never buy it though.


    Sisi
     
  14. cookm

    cookm

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    No, I wasn't kidding when I wrote about the Yorkshire pudding with fish essence. [​IMG]
    What do you serve it with? A garbage can, as far as I'm concerned.
    There should be a smiley (or disgusted!) face projectile vomiting...

    [This message has been edited by cookM (edited September 02, 2000).]
     
  15. cape chef

    cape chef

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    I have not seen kunz book yet but it should be a great read. P.s watch out how you spell Kunz shroomgirl........lol [​IMG]
     
  16. unichef

    unichef

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    Fusion is a reflection of our American Heritage, that's what American cuisine is. Look at our people, and our resources.

    We have such a diverse make-up of people and product that we will naturally combine a lot of it.

    ------------------
    Mike Bersell, CEC
    [email protected]
     
  17. cape chef

    cape chef

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    yuck, That mahi sounds disgusting, What cost 30$ a # though sisi? I hope not the mahi!! anyway fusion has become quite the rage and I agree less is more. I think some of the chefs that where successful we're gray Kunz formilly of lespinasse in the St.Regis in Manhattan example Sauted shrimp with marinated spaghetti squash and curry cilentro vinaigrette.it has beets,papaya ,ginger,curry,cilentro ect. But man does it work because he understands and respects all the nuiances of the ingredients I also think that Jean-georges Vongerichten is a pioneer in this type of aproach to cooking, just in his infused oils and fresh vegetable juices you see a abundece of fuision,how about beet juice and caviar with black bass?
    sounds funny!! taste great. he was one of the first to do tuna tartare.cod cakes with orenge-basil oil..I quess what im saying there is a place for fusion. but we must know what we are diong to give justest to that cuisine
     
  18. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    OOOOPPPPSSSS! My apologies.
     
  19. m brown

    m brown

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    Please do not beat me with a stick, Fish Sauce, yes that liquid that smells like a homeless mans feet ( If you've ever been in the subway in NYC after hours or AM you KNOW what I'm saying.) When used in the perfect measure adds a special something and it isn't a fishy thing more of a briney thing. I could see it in Yorkshire Pudding.

    I remember having a Sage Infused Creme Brulee, it tasted like sausage. Some herbs are best suited for the job they do best.

    spam spam spam spam spam spam spam spam spam
    [​IMG]
     
  20. jim berman

    jim berman

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    Here, here!

    America certainly is the 'tossed salad' of the world, keeping in mind that moderation is everything.