Frying eggs

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by teamfat, Mar 1, 2014.

  1. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Rather than hijack the 'What's for dinner' thread, I'll respond to @jake t buds question about fried eggs.

    I normally use a 5" cast iron skillet.  Get it heated up over medium heat.  Put a nice pat of butter in it, get it melted.

    I try to start with room temp eggs as well.  Crack them into a small bowl while waiting for the skillet.  Slip the eggs in, turn the heat down a notch.  Wait a minute or two before seasoning.  I like mine sunny side up, slip them out of the pan as soon as the whites have set.  My little skillet is well seasoned, they slide right out, say, onto a pile of grits or hash browns or ...

    mjb.

     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2014
  2. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I had to go hunting for that question teamfat, and here it is:  jake t buds asked:

    "Speaking of fried eggs. What's everybody's favorite method? I grew up with heating olive oil in a cast iron pan until it starts to smoke around the perimeter, turn off the flame and add the room temp eggs. Use the spatula to splash hot oil over the yolk, turning it white and fry until the edges are crispy and brown. Drain and serve with crusty country style bread or a daily baguette."

    Frying eggs is a skill I cannot perform in any other kitchen with any other equipment aside from my own.  When I visit my parents in Greece I beg my mother or grandmother to fry me eggs because if I get near their kitchen I ruin the yolks time after time!

    I like mine over easy fried in a tiny bit of olive oil.  I've made them in butter but I find that butter makes the whites soft and therefore difficult to flip and I don't like much browning.  Hot oil, carefully crack the egg (room temp makes a big difference in flavor and texture) into the oil keeping the yolk intact.  It spits and splatters a bit, and I season with salt and pepper.  I carefully flip with my lucky spatula, turn off the flame and barely leave them in there before I season them and take them out, 10-15seconds later.  I flip them right side up into the plate.  Then I drizzle the pan with a little fresh olive oil, just enough to take the chill out and serve that oil alongside the eggs, all the more to dip my bread in.
     
  3. ordo

    ordo

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  4. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Yesterday, I was watching one of our leading chefs in a TV program on... eggs. Very interesting series of short demonstrations because I already saw more things that I never do with frying eggs and will probably never do after seeing all of that...

    The main thing yesterday was that those uber-pro's remove the skin that appears on top of the eggyolk. When I saw mjb's first picture in the opening post, it reminded me instantly what they meant. The trick is to gently push that thin layer on the yolks back. The demonstrating chef used a fork to do it. Well, I'm not going to bother much about that, especially since my fried eggs mostly don't have time to develop that skin, I like them runny.

    On another occasion, I learned that those same uber-pro's salt...the pan before adding the eggs! Seems salt "burns" the yolks, that's when you have those white spots. Sigh and sigh once more...

    One thing I do is to heat a non-stick pan to a good medium heat first, then add maybe a tsp of sunflower oil which is even more neutral than Switserland. I crack the eggs over the pan, as low as possible and let the content slowly slide into the pan. This takes no longer than 3-4 seconds, time enough for the egg to start cooking asap and for the rest of the egg to land onto the part that already has started to coagulate. This way the whole egg doesn't cover the whole pan but gets a little thickness. Here's an example, as you can see with plenty salt and freshly ground black pepper on top. Eggs and salt: that's a must!;

     
  5. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Braised,

     hot pan - in goes the butter, let it melt.

    Add eggs and let them start to set about 30 seconds later add 2-3 tbs of water and a tight fitting lid.

    Remove from heat and let stand for about a minute.

    Slide them out onto hot buttered toast.  

    No runny egg whites, no slime but perfectly warm and runny egg yolks.
     
  6. jake t buds

    jake t buds

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    Thanks teamfat for creating a new thread. 

    Although I do like different methods of frying eggs, I find it interesting that nobody likes crispy edges. I like it especially when serving over white rice.
     
  7. french fries

    french fries

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    That egg is perfect and the photograph is just beautiful. Is that a carbon steel or non-stick pan Ordo? 
    Thanks for the laugh, Chris. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2014
  8. ordo

    ordo

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    Carbon steel pan. I heat the dry pan, put a good amount of oil (Switzerland oil), turn the flame off and gently baste the egg. It seems it will never cook, but it does.



     
  9. maryb

    maryb

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    Teflon pan, bacon fat 1/2 inch deep from frying off the bacon, over easy. Sorry no pictures I am out of bacon...
     
  10. kara

    kara

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    Oh I'm going to have to try this when I want pretty eggs for pictures. I've never been able to master the perfectly yellow-orange yolk on a cooked white w/out getting runny slimy whites. Thanks! :)
     
  11. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Seems like a lot of fat, but it reminded me.  When I do use bacon fat for frying the eggs, like @jake t buds I let the edges get brown and crispy.  Never with butter, only with bacon fat.  Seems an odd habit.

    mjb.
     
  12. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Actually one place I worked, I did single eggs this way in a wok, it was beef tallow though.   (cross utilization from our beef stock making)

    Crisped up the edges really good and made sure the whites where cooked but the yolk had to be runny still.

    Then onto a bowl of noodles and broth, an adaptation of ramen style but with thick udon noodles. 

    Tons of herbs and hidden-treasures topped with a slice of beef cooked in the bowl and a crispy fried egg.
     
  13. maryb

    maryb

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    Usually whatever fat is left from frying the bacon. I baste the tops of the eggs with the fat to set the whites then hand me some toast to dip in the yokes. Always drain a bit on paper towels by tilting the spatula with the egg on it enough to get the excess fat to run off.at the lake the eggs would be floating after cooking off bacon for 7 people. Campfire cooked bacon, then fry off potatoes in the same pan while keeping the bacon warm off to the side of the fire, then fry off eggs 2-3 per person then hit the lake for a day of fishing.
     
  14. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Sounds like a perfect day!
     
  15. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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     @jake t buds  I thought only us freaks from Hawaii like our eggs crispy over steamed white rice... yum, some shoyu and furikake ... maybe a side of crispy SPAM ... ALOHA!