Frozen geoduck, any idea to cook it?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by josh71, Jan 24, 2015.

  1. josh71

    josh71

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    I saw a bag of frozen geoduck, one kg. Any nice idea to cook it?

    I have never tasted geoduck before 😀

    And I watched few YouTube videos about how to prepare.

    For sure this is not suitable for sashimi because it's not fresh.

    The most common would be slice it and deep fried with coated breadcrumb like tempura, or probably sautee / stir fry with butter, garlic and toss of citrus.

    Any more ideas? 😀
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    You could make chowder, a ciopino, go chinese style with it substituting it in Clams in Black Bean Sauce.  Seafood dishes with Black Bean Sauce are quite good.

    I admit an interest in trying it as a steak or chop, but it would probably be tough that way.

    Italy used to have dishes for cooked Giant Mussels, so if you could find one of those recipes, a geoduck might substitute in nicely. 

     
  3. teamfat

    teamfat

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    A Chinese market that opened up recently in Slat Lake has live geoducks in a tank. I'm tempted.

    mjb.
     
  4. chefross

    chefross

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    Josh, geoduck is one of those items that is best prepared just cooked like calamari or fully cooked in a stew.

    It tends to be very chewy if not prepared correctly.

    I've never had it frozen and thawed, so I can't make any judgment.
     
  5. mikelm

    mikelm

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    Back in the day when we lived on Puget Sound, geoducks were there, but not much harvested because they lurked 2-3 feet down in soupy sand and were very hard to dig up due to the sand collapsing as you dug.  You wound up squirming your entire arm down into the sand, with your cheek against the wet sand, and you had to get your hand under  the critter to lift it.  If you pull on the siphon, it just breaks off.  We just went after the much easier clams, oysters, and sometimes spiny urchins.  Those were good times!

    They were favored for chowder, since they're pretty tough. As you probably know, the siphon/body is WAY too big to fit into their shell, so shucking them is no big challenge.

    They're commercially harvested now, as I understand it, by divers with high-pressure hoses to blow away the sand and expose the beds so they can easily be picked up.

    Mike
     
  6. chefross

    chefross

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    Mike....I did just what you explained 2 summer's a go in Port Angeles. The critter that came up was about a foot and half long, but my friends showed me that as it is curled up that way and when extended fully, was more then 6 feet long.......

    It was difficult to harvest but it was sweet and delicious.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2015