Fresh Pasta ??

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Joined Aug 10, 2013
After you have your ingredients incorporated, how long do you knead your dough ??
Some say until it is smooth and elastic and stop . Than I saw another method , it said knead the dough eight minutes, to build gluten. The test is to put a thumb indent into the dough and if it bounces back its good. Any input would be helpful ??
 
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Joined May 5, 2010
"Until smooth and elastic," is the best way of describing the dough after kneading.
When you first incorporate the ingredients the dough looks like a large boulder with many bulging rocks and craters all over it. You want to knead these out. Recipes are guidelines, so 8 minutes might be the recipe's author's way. You are effectively creating gluten strands when kneading. The more the better. Don't forget to allow the dough to rest after kneading. It's an important step.
 
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In order to determine an ideal knead time, it's important to understand what happens if you knead too little or too much.

If you knead too little, the dough won't build enough gluten/elasticity and your pasta won't have that kinda-elastic snap when you bite into them.

If you knead too much... well you can't really knead too much, you'll just become really tired because the more gluten you build the more of a pain in the rear it becomes to knead the dough. The only danger is that your dough may start to dry out.

Generally it should take around 10mn.
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
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Also, are you talking about an all hand process or do you mean after it comes out of the mixer?
 
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Joined Dec 18, 2010
I make pasta in food processor. Very fast. Kneading only takes a couple of minutes. After that hand kneading only necessary to form a pretty ball to rest.
 
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Joined Aug 10, 2013
I put 2 cups of 00 Flour and a pinch of salt, in the food processor . Quick mix and then added three egg , lightly beaten and a scant TS olive oil . Once every thing came together, out of the machine and onto the marble .
It seamed a little dry to me, so I wet my hands with a little, water and worked it to a ball . It was relatively smooth
what setting do you make your fettuccine two or three . Last time I did this I used all purpose floure and liked the result better. What are you guys doing ???
 
3,292
726
Joined May 5, 2010
I put 2 cups of 00 Flour and a pinch of salt, in the food processor . Quick mix and then added three egg , lightly beaten and a scant TS olive oil . Once every thing came together, out of the machine and onto the marble .
It seamed a little dry to me, so I wet my hands with a little, water and worked it to a ball . It was relatively smooth
what setting do you make your fettuccine two or three . Last time I did this I used all purpose floure and liked the result better. What are you guys doing ???

All purpose works best. I have always been a fan of The French Laundry recipe. They incorporate, a bit of white vinegar, and a touch of milk in theirs in addition to the eggs, egg yolks, flour, and oil.

I don't know what machine you have, but Ii you have an ATLAS pasta machine, you would use the first 4 settings to roll your dough, and either 5 or 6 depending on how you like your fettuccine.
 
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Joined Oct 23, 2008
In my experience .. using equipment to make pasta I just use a dough hook on a stand mixer to combine the ingredients and run it until it has formed a ball. Then, rather than kneading it more with the dough hook or by hand, I use the pasta roller and effectively do the same by running it through the roller. By the time I have reached the desired thickness for most pasta I've folded and run through enough times that the sheets are very elastic. This works well for ravioli or typical cuts like spaghetti or linguine.
 

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