French profile chef knife

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Hey all, looking into adding the French profile chef knife to my roll. I've been playing with them recently and just has a better feel for me but I'm not too familiar with many kinds or brands. Can anyone help me out? I know about the K Sabathier knives but a lot of people tell me no. Is it worth it? What should I get
 
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Hi grekko welcome to Cheftalk

Do you have a budget?

Blade length?

Stainless or non-stainless?

Do you have a way to deal with the full bolster fingerguards of K-Sabs?
 
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Hey Foody,

Thanks for the reply. When it comes to a good knife of course one must be prepared to spend a few bucks. That being said I'm also not looking for very luxurious blades so around 250 USD is my budget (taxes, shipping, etc. Included).

My ideal blade length would be in the 9"-10" range.

I was leaning to more carbon steel blade but I'm not decided as of yet if you have suggestion for different types of steel I'd love to hear.

What do you mean by do I have a way to deal with the full bolster?
 
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http://www.sabatier-shop.com/kitche...intage_cooking-knife-10-in__carbcui25pol.html As you sharpen, the full bolster fingerguard will need to be ground down so that you can reach the edge all along the length of the blade. Failing to do this and just sharpening in front of the fingerguard will result in a 'hole' in your blade profile where it fails to make contact with the board

K-Sab makes this '200 series' that does not have the fingerguard and thus avoids this problem. http://www.sabatier-shop.com/2460-200---8-generations-cooking-knife-10-in---200-range.html

Stainless steel, though don't know much about its performance. Its price competes in the same range as some western handled Japanese knives (stainless and carbon) that have a more French blade profile

How will you be sharpening your purchase?
 
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Wow. I never thought of that. Is there any way to deal with that from home? Couldn't I always just go get it sharpened and have them grind out a part of the bolster?

 I have a few cheap stones and steels at home, but with the purchase of my new chef knife was going to look into a good set of stones. If you would like to give me your recommendation it would be greatly appreciated. It seems you are very knowledgeable.
 
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Full blade bolster or "finger guard" is the devil. Don't buy one ever. I will double down on this advice if it is stainless steel. You can't sharpen it and that means you can't use the heel of your knife which IMO is nuts. You can remove it with a file, a dremel, or other power tools but why should you waste your time?

If all you're after is the flatter profile of french knives, I have never seen a Japanese knife with one. Yeah the steel is harder, but a lot of them are in a medium not too chippy range like 57-60. If you're in the US look at these http://korin.com/Knives/Togiharu-Knives_2

If you want to go full Japanese and are willing to learn the nuances of usage and maintenance there are even more options
 
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Joined Aug 4, 2000
Full blade bolster or "finger guard" is the devil. Don't buy one ever. I will double down on this advice if it is stainless steel. You can't sharpen it and that means you can't use the heel of your knife which IMO is nuts. You can remove it with a file, a dremel, or other power tools but why should you waste your time?........
I personally haven't had any problems with sharpening my CS Sabatiers at the heel for the past 40 years.  You just gotta' know how to handle the heel of the knife on the oilstone.
 
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If you want a 10" carbon knife with a great profile look for a good used, or NOS Forgecraft.  The handles aren't pretty, but they are easy to replace if you have any fab skills at all.  They rockwell at @ 60 and that's hard for a USA carbon blade.

Here's mine -

 
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If you want a 10" carbon knife with a great profile look for a good used, or NOS Forgecraft.  The handles aren't pretty, but they are easy to replace if you have any fab skills at all.  

Here's mine -

I rehandled, thinned, and gifted 3 of these 2 years ago.  Back then they were ~$30 on ebay.  Now a used one of questionable condition is avg $90.   Can't imagine what new old stock goes for, but that's more than I want to spend on a project knife.
 
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If you want a 10" carbon knife with a great profile look for a good used, or NOS Forgecraft.  The handles aren't pretty, but they are easy to replace if you have any fab skills at all.  They rockwell at @ 60 and that's hard for a USA carbon blade.

Here's mine -

WIth those long, horizontal indentations along the top of the blade, it resembles the Old Hickory CS knives selling for less than $20 during the '70s and '80s.  8)
 
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I picked up one of the only decent condition ones under $90 bucks or so that I've seen on eBay in months and months. It'll need a good deal of thinning behind the edge, but profile will only need a little fixing
 
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Old Hickory, Ontario and Forgecraft all came up in the same era.  The story is they were made from cold rolled band mill blades that when no longer serviceable were scrapped.  The steel found new life as knife blades.  100% American 1095 carbon steel. 
 
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Which model is that? Do you have a link for the worrkhorse you speak of ? It sounds perfect... I don't generally go for used knives because most of the carbons have pitting along the blade..the corrosion and such I can fix from home but for the piting and dents I think the only way would be to sand the blade which will make the blade much more thin
 
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Which model is that? Do you have a link for the worrkhorse you speak of ? It sounds perfect... I don't generally go for used knives because most of the carbons have pitting along the blade..
Pitting is very common to CS knives.  Don't confuse pits with corrosion.  Pits accompany the manufacturing process.  Also if you read the info on Sabatiers at the Best Things, it's quite common for the blade to be slightly curved as mine are and it makes no difference in performance unless the curve is severe.

This is what I use for all of my knives:  https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/Norton-3-Stone-IM313-System-P48C65.aspx

When using the fine india stone I first push the edge lightly into the stone for a few strokes on each side.  Then I draw the blade in reverse for a few strokes on each side.  The finer the stone, the lighter the pressure.
 
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...........I don't generally go for used knives because most of the carbons have pitting along the blade..the corrosion and such I can fix from home but for the piting and dents I think the only way would be to sand the blade which will make the blade much more thin
Nope!  All I do to remove any "staining" and CS will, indeed stain or discolor, is moisten the blade, sprinkle some dutch cleanser like Barkeeper's Friend onto it, and rub with a cork.  Works wonders.

Please lemme' know @grekko that you received the pics.
 

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