french fry woes

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by jerilyn, May 21, 2012.

  1. jerilyn

    jerilyn

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    ok so I'm a pastry chef gone wild---things have actually been going pretty good until I tried to make crispy fench fries in my home Waring Pro Deep FF---it only goes up to 375. Why are they NOT crispy ? I have literaly tried everything. double frying --peanut oil, canola oil , veg oil--- Whats the best oil and whats the best temp? Is it possible to make restaurant fries at home ? HELP  oh ---I also soaked them in cold water and dried them thoroughly.
     
  2. iamdog90

    iamdog90

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    Some people like to "blanch" the fries first in 250 degree oil until they are cooked through.
    Once that is done you turn the heat back up, and drop the pre-cooked fries into that fry cooker.
    As soon as they come out put salt and pepper to taste. Maybe get a Sugar Thermometer to regulate temperature ?
    They are like 10 dollars at some knive specialty stores, maybe can get one at wal mart.
    So go from like deep fry 250 - then 375.
     
     
  3. chefchrisd

    chefchrisd

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    Good procedure for fries (best in Phoenix recipe):

    Peel potatoes

    Cut fries

    Submerge in water, cover overnight in walk-in

    Remove from water (drain), place on sheet trays

    Blanch fries at 300 degrees for 4 minutes

    Return to sheet trays to cool

    Pan up fries

    For service: cook fries for an additional 3 minutes at about 375 degrees in vegetable frying oil

    Season and enjoy
     
  4. thetincook

    thetincook

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    Peanut oil makes great fries.

    Sounds like it's an overloading problem or an inaccurate thermostat.
     
  5. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Blanch first, chill then fry to order  always works  final temp 360-365   blanch temp 275-300.
     
  6. chefross

    chefross

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    Guys the OP already said that they "double fried" which infers the blanching.

    From what you say it sounds like you simply did not allow the fries to remain in the oil long enough.

    I make fries often. I blanch, allow them to rest until service then refry @375.

    Most home fryers don't go higher than that.

    I have a Waring Pro as well.
     
  7. jerilyn

    jerilyn

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    Thanks all of you for getting back to me regarding my " french fry woes" with a thermometer and a longer fry ----I'm hopeful !!!!
     
  8. kingofnull

    kingofnull

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    Don't see why all the above advice wouldn't work. I often make frites at home for the picky eaters, and never had issue with soak, dry, blanch, fry, season.
     
  9. mistershow

    mistershow

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    I agree with all.  Cut, soak overnight, blanch at 300, cook at 375. Makes some pretty tasty fries.
     
  10. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    I have hand cut fries on the menu, do about #50 a day, cut, soak, rinse, blanch @ 300 until soft, no color. Cool completely,(I stay a day ahead) re fry at 350-375 until desired color.

    As far as crispy, all depends on the spud. Some days I get very crispy fries that stay crispy long enough for you to finish them, other days, they are soft just a couple of minutes out of the fryer.